LA Sleeve FL-3244 Help - Page 2

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  1. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by rainyp71 View Post
    Ed, another question. What depth should the receiver groove be cut to in the sleeve flange?

    Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk
    Ah Ha!! Caught you!

    You didn't read the installation manual at the end of my post #11. It is all covered in the installation manual.

    More significantly however, if you are using an experienced shop you don't have to either know or tell him. He already knows.


    Ed

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  3. #17

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    Darn, you caught me Ed. Thanks!!!

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  4. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by eschaider View Post
    Yes you can, and more importantly, it is the correct way to go. I misused the Pro naming convention when I should have used the Titan naming convention. The only difference is the coolant and oil sealing that the Titan version provides. Otherwise the gaskets are the same.

    Although I have not made a big deal of it in this thread, you absolutely do not want to run the Titan gaskets without the stainless wire o-ring in the head and corresponding receiver groove in the flanges of the sleeves. While we are in the absolute do not want bucket, you absolutely do not want to run the ICS versions of their gaskets with your sleeved version of the engine. The correct gasket is the Titan, receiver grooves in the sleeve flanges and stainless wire o-rings in the heads. BTW the gaskets are reusable — how about those apples ...


    Ed
    Back in the day we o ringed the block, had stainless wire in that and used copper head gaskets

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  6. #19

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    In general you want to put the o-ring wire in the more malleable metal and the receiver groove in the less malleable (read harder) metal. The harder material was always the target for the receiver groove.

    There is a rationale behind the methodology. As it turns out on the malleability scale aluminum is near the top, cast iron is substantially farther down and copper falls in-between favoring the cast iron end of the scale. When you put a receiver groove into aluminum and use copper gaskets with stainless o-rings in the opposing mating surface, the pressure from the essentially noncompress-able stainless wire pushing through the copper gasket will mush out the nicely formed receiver groove in the aluminum creating a sealing issue.

    By way of contrast, copper can not mush out the cast iron and an excellent interlocking high pressure seal is possible to create and maintain. When both the block and the head are made of aluminum the only way to create a reliable combustion pressure capable sealing joint is to use sleeves with a flange wide enough to accommodate the o-ring receiver groove.

    Not withstanding the correct way to implement the seal, there are all manner of variations that have been used over the years. When all the smoke finally cleared, the receiver grooves in cast iron liners or cast iron block decks was the hands down winner along with the stainless wire being installed into the softer more pliable aluminum head casting deck surfaces and a dead soft or annealed 0.043" solid copper gasket between the two.


    Ed
    Last edited by eschaider; 09-05-2019 at 04:10 PM. Reason: Spelling & Grammar

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