Turbo Engine Re-Build - Page 9

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  1. #121

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    Quick seal applied, hazy green, so it’s clean!
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    Lesson learned, install the very bottom ring first, (the one that’s a pain to install) the dimple I believe faces down to keep it from rotating. The dimple locates in the wristpin hole.
    Next the expander ring, because as I’ve learned, the inside has a taller ledge, next install the two rings above and below. Once all 4 rings are in, it’s almost impossible to reposition the opening in the rings.

    Once the top two rings are installed (2nd ring has a dot that faces up) and the top ring can be installed both ways. Line everything up, lightly install in piston compressor with a small dab of 30w oil and tap in. The was a small audible pop when the piston was fully seated in the bore, piston rings sealing against the cylinder wall.
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    Using plastigage, the bearing tolerance was measured at .002. Removed plastigage, used assembly lube on the bearing faces, and torqued to 60ftlbs.
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  3. #122

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    TotalSeal top rings usually have a dimple on them (like your second rings) indicating the topside of the ring, Matt. Make sure yours either do or do not and proceed accordingly. When installing rods, I prefer to use a rod bolt stretch gauge and record the torque necessary to hit the rod bolt stretch that ARP recommends for the bolt you are using. While the torque only approach will work the stretch approach guarantees everything is as it should be. A rod bearing oil clearance of 0.002" is correct. Remember the 0.001" clearance per inch of journal diameter guideline.

    Be sure your pistons and rings are generously lubricated in and around the ring lands or you will damage the ring lands at first start.

    While there is no shortage of sage explanations about the optimum way to position the rings on the piston at assembly the simple fact of the matter is that they rotate in service and will be different than they were when you assembled the engine. Given that, then you want to assembly the ring s to the piston in such a manner as to not line up ring gaps making it as difficult as is reasonably possible for combustion gasses to have an easy in line exit path to the crankcase. Given that there is no optimum orientation the following pic is probably as good as any;

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    When you install the oil ring spacer ring (the tough one to install) try starting one end in the oil ring groove an then "wind" the rail into place. As the end of the ring comes up to the skirt on the piston take a tin can lid off a can of pet food or other tin can and place it between the oil rail and the piston to protect the piston from the sharp edge of the spacer ring as you "wind" it into the oil land.




    Ed


    p.s. Keep the oil rail support ring's (the tough one to install) gap away from the pin bore. In the pic above the correct position for that gap would be 12 O'Clock not 9 or 3 O'Clock. Putting the gap in the pin bore defeats the reason for using the support rail in the first place. Additionally in the which way is up discussion, dimples on spacers and piston rings usually indicate the top side. Contact your ring manufacturer and ask him how he wants you to place the dimpled oil rail support ring, he has provided you.
    Last edited by eschaider; 02-09-2020 at 11:28 AM. Reason: Added Postscript

  4. #123

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    A little more in depth:
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    Bottom support rail
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    All 4 rings in the bottom
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    Piston assembled
    Clean bore before
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    Clean bore with quik seat

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  6. #124

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    Plastigage on rod.
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    Plastigage compressed to .002
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    Gotta put down the phone now and get to work! Got 6 more to do, hope this helps someone!

  7. #125

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    Still have a v6, waiting on the last two top rings from Gibtec, but everything good up to this point!

    Got the cobra engineering timing studs and the cobra engineering remote oil mount installed.

    Need to make my last order to summit racing, I decided against the .036 head gaskets and opted for .040 due to ship time. Should put me a tick under 10.3:1 compression. My last setup used .030 and lower boost, I plan on taking up that extra space and filling it with more boost rather than static compression.

    Also need a rear main seal yet, any suggestions? They seem very vague on make and model, quite an interchange!

    After I get the last two rings, filed, and pistons installed, I’ll move into the boundary oil pump and pickup tube. Other than head gaskets and a rear main, it’s ready to be buttoned up and installed!

  8. #126

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    With the exception of teflon based seals OEM and aftermarket are pretty much the same. Use whichever one is most available to you.


    Ed

  9. #127

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    Quote Originally Posted by eschaider View Post
    With the exception of teflon based seals OEM and aftermarket are pretty much the same. Use whichever one is most available to you.


    Ed
    Yes, there are quite a few listed, didn’t see much difference, or discernible difference in them. Thanks again Ed!

  10. #128

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    What lower radiator hose am I looking for? I’m not even sure what “style” oil filter adapter I have to cross reference or search. I could probably make my stock 2v work by sleeving a 90 degree on the end that attaches to the coolant tube on the the plate. I just didn’t know if there was a factory setup similar with the coolant reservoir tee’d into it like the stock 2v.

  11. #129

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    Quote Originally Posted by CrucialProspect View Post
    What lower radiator hose am I looking for? I’m not even sure what “style” oil filter adapter I have to cross reference or search. I could probably make my stock 2v work by sleeving a 90 degree on the end that attaches to the coolant tube on the the plate. I just didn’t know if there was a factory setup similar with the coolant reservoir tee’d into it like the stock 2v.

    There isn't. I believe James uses a 1.75" diameter inlet tube. Go to your local parts store and get a 1.75" ID 90˚ bend radiator hose and then plumb from there to your radiator. Alternatively get a 1.75" 90˚ stainless bend and use a short length of straight radiator hose to the block. Plumb the other end back to your radiator with appropriate hose bends and lengths.


    Ed

  12. #130

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    I guess I was kidding when I said last order from Summit, I’ve put together my timing list which consists of the TFS supplemental kit of solid lash adjuster and the crank adapter for my degree wheel.
    TFS-90100
    And crank adapter
    Comp-4793
    Any reason after all this time of factory lash adjuster to switch over to the GT followers?

  13. #131

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    Quote Originally Posted by CrucialProspect View Post
    I guess I was kidding when I said last order from Summit, I’ve put together my timing list which consists of the TFS supplemental kit of solid lash adjuster and the crank adapter for my degree wheel.
    TFS-90100 And crank adapter Comp-4793
    The crank adapter you are planning to use employs a set screw to anchor it on the crank snout. The set screw will mar the snout on your crank. If that is OK with you then that crank adapter is OK to use. If that is not OK with you then you need to use this non marring alternative => Jomar Products

    If you do not want to buy the degree wheel and Hub adapter and your degree wheel has a 1.25" hole in the center, then you can buy just the hub adapter with a ⅝ inch reducer bushing, make a sleeve to take it down to 12mm and you are good to go. If you want to avoid the fabrication process then get the ½ inch reducer bushing and use it w/o a sleeve. 12mm is 0.472" so you will have about 0.014" clearance around the 12mm OEM bolt.



    Quote Originally Posted by CrucialProspect View Post
    Any reason after all this time of factory lash adjuster to switch over to the GT followers?
    If you had none and were buying brand new then I would buy the GT followers. If you already have serviceable factory followers I would not spend the monies. If you are talking about the hydraulic lash adjusters in the head there is no difference other than the GT intake lash adjusters will not fit in the Cobra "C" heads.


    Ed

  14. #132

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    Ah, thanks Ed!

  15. #133

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    I’m having a brain fart, my oil pump bolt mounting kit (the bolts I took out) I have 3 m6 40mm, but the last bolt is mia. I swear I bagged and tagged everything accordingly. Is one of those bolts also used for the timing chain set? I’ve got one exact one in my timing set that’s 65mm long on the drivers side. Does that sound correct? Iirc the lower passenger side timing guide shares that bolt.

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