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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Discussion Starter • #1 20 m ago (Edited)

I have a 4.6 2v Romeo that I installed a Compstar forged crank in. I am having an issue the the reluctor setting in between the 2 key ways on this crank . Therefore it is not locked or indexed on a key way. My stock crank has one continuous key way instead of 2 with a gap between them. Has anyone come across this or could I be missing something? Stock crank gear is the one piece and it has the stamped steel wheel. I also have a TFS adjustable crank gear set with washer that when installed leaves the wheel in the same gap.

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That is the first time I’ve ever seen a two piece key like that. Unless you wanna remove the crank to have it machine the only workaround I can think of, is to track down an old Steeda timing adjuster which moves the crankshaft position sensor to the exterior.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That is the first time I’ve ever seen a two piece key like that. Unless you wanna remove the crank to have it machine the only workaround I can think of, is to track down an old Steeda timing adjuster which moves the crankshaft position sensor to the exterior.
Thanks for your thoughts. I purchased the Callies Compstar forged crank from ModMax. I got with them about this. It appears this is the way Callies makes their 4.6 cranks. They checked other callies cranks they had and all were like mine. They did some mock ups and found that if I use the trickflow gears with the older and thicker cast trigger it will work. They sent via Air a thicker trigger. I must be one of the first guys to buy the Callies crank from them, or the first with the newer. crank gear and stamped wheel. I have email into Callies and they have not responded. I am not familiar with the Steeda adjuster. I am a little worried about the reliability of the older cast trigger.
 

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Yes, unless you’re buying one of the expensive aftermarket billet reluctor wheels I would use the stamped version. However I am also a firm believer that the breakages are more due to harmonics from poor harmonic balancers rather than the cast piece itself
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes, unless you’re buying one of the expensive aftermarket billet reluctor wheels I would use the stamped version. However I am also a firm believer that the breakages are more due to harmonics from poor harmonic balancers rather than the cast piece itself
I have a new TFS Harmonic balancer going on. Unfortunately since the stamped will not fit I am stuck with the cast. It is a turbo car but due to funds it will start life with stock heads and PI intake so RPM will be limited. I eventually plan on after market intake and heads. That being said I doubt Rpms will be much over 6500 to 6800. From your experience do u think the cast will hold up?
 

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It’s a dice roll honestly.With that said, I’ve never run one past 500ish whp. I’d also invest in an ATI damper
 

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Callies is famous for their Chevrolet cranks and has catered to the Chevrolet market for years decades. They are not a Ford or Modmotor shop. Apparently they have decided to expand their market and add Ford products. The key placement you are seeing is like that used on some Chevrolet crank snouts. Here are three pictures of typical Chevrolet snouts from their catalog;
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They built your crank with some sort of Chevrolet styled keyway placement. That is not the way a Modmotor crank snout should be. Additionally you do not want to use the diminutive Modmotor woodruff key on the snout of a performance crank. The OEM woodruff key will fail in performance applications, damaging the snout and what ever else the key comes in contact with. You definitely want to use, at a minimum, a full length hardened steel 3/16" key and keyway with a 0.002" press fit between the damper and the crank snout.

ModMax is a parts reseller and I seriously doubt you will get any satisfaction or satisfactory resolution from them. They fit into a category of reseller that frequently has unhappy endings for these sorts of problems — which is a good reason not to ever use them.

You want your crank snout key and keyway to minimally look like is this;

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What you have is obviously not a Modmotor style key placement, it is something else. You have multiple solution sets available to you at this point;
  • Do nothing — this one won't work,
  • Create custom devices to adapt to an incorrect snout design — not a good idea
  • Get the snout re-keyed for a full length 3/16 key — the best idea.
  • Return the crank and ask for a replacement with the correct snout —unlikely success scenario,
  • Return the crank for a refund — very unlikely success scenario
  • Use small claims court to fix the problem — high probable success, aggravating and takes time.
If I were you I would be sending the crank out to a crank shop to be rekeyed correctly. I would not buy any future modmotor parts from companies whose reputation was built on non-modmotor products and engines. I would not use ModMax for anything, even spark plugs, going forward.

You are learning, the hard way, about doing adequate research before beginning a project or buying parts. The particulsr lesson is a hard learned, memorable but important learning experience. Kluge fixes are just that, kluge fixes. I highly recommend you not embrace a kluge fix to you crank snout dilemma. Make a decision to do things correctly going forward.


Ed
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Callies is famous for their Chevrolet cranks and has catered to the Chevrolet market for years decades. They are not a Ford or Modmotor shop. Apparently they have decided to expand their market and add Ford products. The key placement you are seeing is like that used on some Chevrolet crank snouts. Here are three pictures of typical Chevrolet snouts from their catalog;
View attachment 175560 View attachment 175561 View attachment 175562

They built your crank with some sort of Chevrolet styled keyway placement. That is not the way a Modmotor crank snout should be. Additionally you do not want to use the diminutive Modmotor woodruff key on the snout of a performance crank. The OEM woodruff key will fail in performance applications, damaging the snout and what ever else the key comes in contact with. You definitely want to use, at a minimum, a full length hardened steel 3/16" key and keyway with a 0.002" press fit between the damper and the crank snout.

ModMax is a parts reseller and I seriously doubt you will get any satisfaction or satisfactory resolution from them. They fit into a category of reseller that frequently has unhappy endings for these sorts of problems — which is a good reason not to ever use them.

You want your crank snout key and keyway to minimally look like is this;

View attachment 175563

What you have is obviously not a Modmotor style key placement, it is something else. You have multiple solution sets available to you at this point;
  • Do nothing — this one won't work,
  • Create custom devices to adapt to an incorrect snout design — not a good idea
  • Get the snout re-keyed for a full length 3/16 key — the best idea.
  • Return the crank and ask for a replacement with the correct snout —unlikely success scenario,
  • Return the crank for a refund — very unlikely success scenario
  • Use small claims court to fix the problem — high probable success, aggravating and takes time.
If I were you I would be sending the crank out to a crank shop to be rekeyed correctly. I would not buy any future modmotor parts from companies whose reputation was built on non-modmotor products and engines. I would not use ModMax for anything, even spark plugs, going forward.

You are learning, the hard way, about doing adequate research before beginning a project or buying parts. The particulsr lesson is a hard learned, memorable but important learning experience. Kluge fixes are just that, kluge fixes. I highly recommend you not embrace a kluge fix to you crank snout dilemma. Make a decision to do things correctly going forward.


Ed
Ed I appreciate your input.
I had reached out to Callies over this issue a couple weeks back. Once I got the opportunity to speak with someone they were very responsive to my issue. They said this was the first they had seen or heard about the issue. I sent them multiple pictures and describe what was happening. Within A couple days they had my crank picked up and they are cutting the keyway correctly. I guess I will see how things progress from here. I thought I would post my progress since a couple of you guys took the time to give me suggestions and feedback. Thank you for that. I will post how it turned out once I receive it back.
Jeff
 

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Ed I appreciate your input.
I had reached out to Callies over this issue a couple weeks back. Once I got the opportunity to speak with someone they were very responsive to my issue. They said this was the first they had seen or heard about the issue. I sent them multiple pictures and describe what was happening. Within A couple days they had my crank picked up and they are cutting the keyway correctly. I guess I will see how things progress from here. I thought I would post my progress since a couple of you guys took the time to give me suggestions and feedback. Thank you for that. I will post how it turned out once I receive it back.
Jeff

Wishing you the best possible outcome. Generally speaking it is to your advantage to do business with firms that are familiar with the engine you have chosen to use and its idiosyncrasies. Although not absolutely necessary it can prevent false parts like you have just experienced. That said sometimes a better product and or better deal are possible with a new provider. Lets cross our collective fingers and hope yours works out this way.


Ed
 
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