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Greetings fellow modular engine fans,
This is my first post on this forum
I just want to start by saying I am a big ford modular engine enthusiast, I have owned a few, and I am also an automotive geek at heart, and I love speculating obscure builds. I have neither the time nor the resources to actually perform a build like I am going to describe, I just love talking about them, and I figure with as long as these engines have been around, there should be some people on this forum who are fairly knowledgeable on these engines and can have a detailed discussion about them.

My question / crazy build idea is this: I know in 2003 ford created a test mule with a one off all aluminum 5.8L modular v10 based on the 4.6L v8 architecture with 2000 cobra R spec DOHC heads, cams, and intake. What would be involved for someone to try and replicate that engine and clone the "BOSS 351" prototype that ford built?

I know the 6.8L v10 was mass produced but there are several major problems with it to be considered for such a crazy build. The first being that it was based on the 5.4L v8 architecture with the stroke and deck height being too tall to properly fit in the SN-95 engine bay. Another problem is the iron block being so heavy the car would be prone to major understeer and bad handling from being so front heavy, and the mass produced heads were all SOHC for both the 2V and 3V variants of the 6.8L. And obviously you couldn't machine a 6.8L iron block deck height down to the 4.6L deck height for structural reasons.

With some quick googling it just appears as though the only option for such a build would be to pay a specialty shop to custom fabricate an engine block (either cast or billet aluminum), crank shaft (for the shorter stroke), DOHC cobra R spec heads, intake, and cams. Obviously such a build would cost tens of thousands of dollars in parts alone, and that is before you even solve the PCM engine management problems which no doubt would mean thousands of extra dollars and lots more custom parts and fabrication.

In this article: Undercover Boss—A Look Inside Ford’s Prototype V10 Mustang
Motortrend talks about some of the detailed specifications of what went into the 2003 "BOSS 351" test mule, and it appears as though they modified the crank to achieve a unique firing order which forced them to use two PCM's to manage the engine as though it were two inline 5 cylinder engines.

I thoroughly enjoy reading about this early 2000's technology and I think its really cool to see where the ford performance engineers were trying to push the next level of performance during that era, and its unfortunate that none of it ever reached the assembly line. I believe a naturally aspirated v10 performance production mustang would have outperformed the "terminator" cobra mustangs, and would have been a serious threat to the dodge viper of the time. In my opinion its very unfortunate that it never made it to fruition, but if some crazy person with deep pockets wanted to build what could have been... what would it take?
 

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The ECU's have improved immensely since 2003. Honestly I think working out a stand alone ECU would be the easiest part of the build.
 

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1988 Mustang Gt, 1984 Mustang Convertible, 1993 Mustang LX
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If you’re going to have a custom block and heads made sure, the triton v10 as enticing as it maybe is not a great motor. For the money build a Godzilla motor
 
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