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Hey guys I have a 5.0 stroker motor right now in my car and the mechanic ran a leak down test on it and it’s a little over 40% leakage I’m wondering is it worth rebuilding the stroker or build a 4.6 stock motor for reliability thanks in advance
 

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There's no reason a properly built stroker can't be as reliable as a stock engine. Personally I'd rather keep the stroker. But then I'm old school since I tend to go with no replacement for displacement.
 

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If I were starting from scratch and ready made low cost strokers like the Manley offerings were not available I would build stock stroke — the price of poker is just less without the additional cost of the stroker. If I were naturally aspirated same answer unless there were a Manley or Manley like stroker alternative. If I already owned the stroker crank and the crank was good I would use it again, without any hesitation.

If the engine were supercharged the power difference is not the size of the container you burn the fuel and air in it is how much fuel and air you burn in the container, i.e. how fast you spin the blower and how much fuel you add that determines your power. Supercharged I would not build it as a stroker — unless I already had a good stroker crank

The consumables in the engine are the pistons, rings and block. Everything else is reusable. If you have an iron block you can safely go up to 0.010" oversize. Personally I would not go larger. There are builders that will go 0.020" over. The failure model for a stock bore and stock stroke iron block is a crack that originates on the common wall between two bores and propagate downward into the main web. Once this occurs there is no repair possible other than block replacement. A stroker crank will aggravate this.

An aluminum block is also tender but more ductile and resistant to cracking than an iron equivalent. The aluminum block choices you jhave are Teksid and Aluminator. Both are good, the Aluminator was the last design Ford used for the non-coyote mod motor blocks. By their own internal engineering assessment the new (at the time) aluminator block more than doubled the duty cycles of any other production aluminum 4.6L block Ford had ever produced.

This is a good article to read about bore size => Why You Want to Use Standard Size Bores.
The other nice attribute of the aluminum blocks (other than loosing 60+ lbs) is the ability to re-sleeve them producing an even better block than the original. The article above on bore sizes also gets into some discussion about the sleeving ro salvage an otherwise good but over-bored block.

Think of iron blocks and most pistons as consumables. Most other components other than cam drive components are re-useable.


Ed
 
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