Mustang and Ford Performance Forums banner
1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I can't believe I found this site right now!!!!

Over the Memorial day weekend I swapped a 97 DOHC into my 94 GT. The physical swap was easy. Installed a Griggs k-member, dropped in the engine and tranny, installed the cobra pcm and wiring harness and I thought everything would be ok.

Well I couln't get it to start. I tried for two weeks and narrowed it down to the pcm not powering up. I hard wired the pcm and the fuel pump comes on, the PATS authenticates, it turns over but doesn't start. After pulling my hair out I finally had to have it towed to SVT dealer. They are looking at it right now. I know I just missed a connection somewhere. I was so close to doing it myself.

Oh well, I need to scour this site for more information and see if I missed anything else.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I know it was getting fuel... I hard wired the fuel pump and I can smell the fuel while it was cranking (due to not hooking up the xpipe yet). I know I was getting 12v at the coils but I stopped there.

I will look over my notes and put together something.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Great, I got a call yesterday from the dealer.. After having my car for week they tell me they can't do anything unless the try hooking everything up themselves. I told them where they should start trouble shooting but I guess that was too much for him.
They said it would be about 2 to 3 k to do everything. I just about flipped.

At least he said he would charge me for the time they already spent on the car.... gee thanks. Let's forget about the week they have had my car and the car rental fee's I have been paying.

So now I have to get my car back home (70 miles) and try again myself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ok, Good news. I worked on it this weekend and I got it started!!!!:D
I traced all the power circuits and found out that there are two hot leads to the CCRM. Only one was getting power. I moved the pins on the C108 connector and it fired right up.

I need to get the x-pipe reworked and I set!!!!!!!

I am almost ready to tear up the streets!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It's down at the muffler shop right now. They are reworking the x-pipe. But now I notice a big oil leak. Its seems to be coming from were the oil pressure sending unit meets the block.
Great one more thing to work on......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have the 97 x pipe that came with the engine. But the transmission mount is different between the 94 and 97. The 94 mount is actually about 5 inches more forward than the 97. So the cats are hitting the tranny mount. They are moving the cats forward a few inches so they will fit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
94DOHC,

I know just what you went through. The CCRM has the EEC relay inside it. Gets is power from a 20 amp circuit in KO or Run. This powers the 361 circuit that is your VPWR for the EEC and all the actuators, sensors and so on. In the CCRM one circuit supplies the EEC and then other is power to your ignition and so on. This also supplies power for the fan, a/c, fuel pump as you probably now know. So my guess would be you had no spark until you hooked up the second circuit.

I ran into the same thing awhile back but it was the fuel pump for me. I took a 95 Mark VIII complete drive train and installed it in a 64 Galaxy 500. I used everything including the cooling fan and complete wire harness. Just left one wire disconnected and it took me 4 days to get the fuel pump to operate correctly. On the Lincoln it’s called a VLCM instead of a CCRM.

Then just recently I was nabbed by the street side, side show Smog Nazi. I passed the tail pipe test but when they looked under the hood they lost it. I have a 95 Mark VIII with a basic 98 Cobra DOHC. So I've been made to comply with the Nazis here. Which was if I were to keep that engine combo I had to have all the emissions that came on the 98 Cobra. This wasn't a problem at first until I found out I would have to change over from the factory Lincoln EEC IV to the Cobra EEC V. To cut this short it was a good challenge but I did it. But had to deal with the VLCM problems again. This time it was that the VLCM no longer has the EEC relay installed in it for the EEC V cars so I had to build my own EEC relay circuits.

I just finished another swap with a 92 Crown Vic. Swapped it over to 2000 4.6 with an EEC V and COP with an AODE. Now that was some fun, 13 days of wiring.

I've got another project in the works right now. Just waiting for the owner to come up with the money, he has everything else. 87 Mustang with a 03 Mach I drive train.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
It's nice to see that misery loves company. The things we put ourselves through just to be unique.:D

It looks like my oil leak is coming from the oil filter adapter. It is leaking around the gasket to the block. It is going to be a bear to get that thing out and replaced.

I have another small electrical issue. The fan won't come on. I ground the wire at the ecm to manually turn on the fan, the relay clicks in the ccrm but the fan doesn't come on. I checked the voltage at the fan connector and it gets voltage when the relay clicks but doesn't come on. I wired the fan directly to the battery and it comes on, so it's not the fan. If I can't figure this one out I am just going to wire up my own fan switch.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
I can understand the desire to keep all the functions and use the VCRM(variable control relay module as labeled in my FORD diagrams) and CCRM...I have never seen VCLM but don't argue that it exists. However I chose to remove the clutter of the nest of wires on both of my swaps, the first using the Mark VIII ECM and the second using the 98 Cobra PCM. I eliminated the PATS in the second with Autologic.
I made my own harnesses and added relays ,fuses, and fusable links as needed. This made some clean installs and worked out well.
By the time I was done, I could wire the 60 pin harness from memory and recall much of the 104 pin layout.
I agree that this is time consuming but it gives a great feeling of accomplishment when all the hair pulling and sore fingers are over. I"m sure you have stood back and listened and said to yourself "I did that and it was worth it"
:king
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I definitely had that feeling last week when it started and I idled for the first time. I had the biggest grin on my face. And yes I did think "I did it myself"!

I think I am going to try and replace that gasket myself this weekend. Any hints on trying to get that adapter out?

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
94 DOHC,

When you did the swap, did you keep the 94 CCLM and just use the 97 EEC V. They may not be compatible.

What I mean is, When I switched over from the EEC IV to the EEC V in the Mark VIII the car started right up but had some codes. Well some of the solenoids and sensors work off a different impedance between the 2 types. For instance I knew about the trans solenoid. If you try and use a ECC IV solenoid with and EEC V you burn up the driver.

Then it was discovered that the fuel pump, a/c and fan were throwing codes. On the Mark the fuel pump is a 2 speed and it would only run in slow. The fan is variable and it would come on as soon as the key was turned and only run in slow. When the a/c was turned on the fan wouldn't speed up.

Then when I took it to get inspected at the Smog Nazis they couldn't get the machine to read any codes through the OBD II connector. But a generic reader could.

Come to find out the factory VLCM (EEC IV) wasn't compatible with the new EEC V. So I had to pick up one for 97/98 EEC V Mark and wire it in. You may be going through the same thing.

See, there's Data +/- circuits that communicate back and forth between the EEC and the CCLM/VLCM. They have to be able to interpret each others signals. If not they either don't work at all or only half way.

I know what you mean by clutter. I built a jumper between the EEC IV and V then ran the additional wires. I couldn't just take the car down and do it since it was my only transportation at the time. So while my buddies where out visiting staying with me Chris (JMS) JW (FordChip) all I had to do was bypass the EDIS, plug in the new EEC and have the new program burned.

I feel the same way about the wiring though. I can just about draw the whole engine compartment wiring for the Mark and the CV from memory.

Oh and also I had to retain all factory equipment operational because of the Smog Nazis or I would have taken some short cuts.

The VLCM looks almost the same at a CCLM but uses a lot of heat shrinks since it has to control a variable speed fan.

EEC V style on the R, EEC IV on the L
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
You still have mw wondering what the heck VCLM and now CCLM stands for, I know you are speaking of the modules you pictured but all the info I have lists them as VCRM (variable control relay module) and CCRM (constant control relay module). What's the deal?

Oh, Chris at JMS dyno tuned my car a few months ago..... he's pretty cool
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
There's also the IRCM Integrated Relay Control Module for the Tbirds/Cougars. The VLCM Variable Load Control Module is the Lincoln version. Where the CCLM Constant Control Relay Module is the Mustangs and other smaller vehicles. I don't know why they made it so confusing by changing the names of them. But they each do basically the same job.

What don't you understand about them?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Ford’s description of the unit is:
Directs voltage and current to the EEC related components. Provides control of the EEC power relay, fuel pump relays, A/C clutch relay and engine cooling fan motor relays.

Here’s a simple break down I’ve come up with though.

Directs voltage and current to the EEC related components.
Provides the 361 circuit with a regulated 12 vdc 20 amps, 30 amp for the Lincolns. This circuit is called VPWR or Vehicle Power. Powers things like the auto transmission, MAF, injectors, canister purge solenoid, EGR, IAC valve, O2 sensors, secondary air injection bypass and diverter solenoids and IMRC Intake manifold Runner Control solenoid.

Provides control of the EEC power relay.
Supplies the circuitry in the EEC and to the components it operates. Not the Keep Alive Power that’s hot all the time.

Provides control of the cooling fan high and low speed relays.
The EEC determines when the fan operation is required by monitoring the coolant temperature and or air conditioning status. When operation is required the EEC signals the VLCM/IRCM/CCRM to turn the fan on to the desired speed.

Provides control of the A/C clutch relay.
When the A/C is turned on it supplies the power for the clutch solenoid and also sends a signal to the EEC letting it know the A/C compressor is activated and thus the EEC sends a signal back to energize the cooling fan’s high speed relay, then adjust the transmission EPC pressure on autos to compensate for the change in torque supply to the trans, while also adjusting the signal to the IAC valve.

Provides control of the Fuel Pump relay.
Supplies the Key On voltage and current to the fuel pump, Fuel Pump Monitor and sending unit. Sends a signal to the EEC that the pump is running and depending on type of vehicle what speed.

All these relays are 20 amp and higher. So there’s no way that the EEC would survive being subjected to the high amps. So what Ford came up with was this box to house these relays and then added a bunch of circuits to control them by signals from the EEC.
These signals or data circuit talk back and forth to keep everything running and if not on certain vehicles it will throw code.
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top