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The Canadian Snowbra
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
To some, this may seem to be a totally outlandish question. However, when looking at a blower like the Eaton, the case temps can get fairly high (enough to burn you immediately after hard driving). For this reason I asked myself why (since the cases are cast, I assume) they chose not to add coolant ducts? It would not be difficult to run an inlet and outlet into and from the case, and with this you could significantly lower boost temps. It's really no different than coolant flowing through a block OR to use a more exact analogy, the coolant ducts in a single cylinder engine.
I'm not really familiar with the IAT2 temps in the Whipple or the KB, and I'm willing to bet that their cases are not cast, which would make putting coolant ducts in them nearly impossible. However, I'd still like to know why this was never considered with the Eaton (maybe it was, and maybe there are other blowers that use this idea).
In any case, it's an interesting concept, which I thought deserved a post-
 

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To some, this may seem to be a totally outlandish question. However, when looking at a blower like the Eaton, the case temps can get fairly high (enough to burn you immediately after hard driving). For this reason I asked myself why (since the cases are cast, I assume) they chose not to add coolant ducts? It would not be difficult to run an inlet and outlet into and from the case, and with this you could significantly lower boost temps. It's really no different than coolant flowing through a block OR to use a more exact analogy, the coolant ducts in a single cylinder engine.
I'm not really familiar with the IAT2 temps in the Whipple or the KB, and I'm willing to bet that their cases are not cast, which would make putting coolant ducts in them nearly impossible. However, I'd still like to know why this was never considered with the Eaton (maybe it was, and maybe there are other blowers that use this idea).
In any case, it's an interesting concept, which I thought deserved a post-
I've been thinking about the same thing. Especially my killer chiller. I think you would have to cool the case evenly to prevent warping over time.
 

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The water lines would only be in "thick" spots and the thin spots like above and around the rotors would still get very hot. It might help with heat soak but not much more. Believe me I've done my fair share of drilling water lines and there really isn't but two places to put them. At the bottom of each rotor on the outside of the case.
 

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The Canadian Snowbra
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Posi, I appreciate your reply, and I was hoping that maybe you'd jump in and comment. It's almost sad that this isn't something we can modify ourselves where, as you say, the case just isn't think enough to support the lines. Having said that, it makes me wonder how difficult it would've been to change the casting of the outer case to have the water ducts in there from the factory.
Even if that was not possible to do, perhaps just making the case it self thick enough to support the water lines, so that they could be modified in the aftermarket to have them. It would really be a pretty trick setup, and it makes me wonder if there is anyone in the aftermarket who has the expertise and equipment to redesign the case. I understand that for the HP/$ gain, not many people would want it unless it had really stunning results.
 

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I think the main problem is for factory design they have 2 heat exchangers in the system. It works nice and cools well for stock. There is no need to make the blower bigger, heavier, and more expensive in order to add something thats not needed in the stock form. Now with the poor IRS, input shaft and a few other things Ford does not really care about making the car efficent once you start modding it. It works great for stock and thats all they care about.

Now if you could add to the upper casting and run lines that might be an idea but then you have thicker metal and it would be alot harder to dissapate heat with that much metal to go through. It would run even hotter.
 

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We Have Heat Extractor Hoods, Just Drive Faster To Get That Heat Out.
 

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On Some Of My Road Race Cars, We Took Ducting And Put The A/c Vents All The Way To The Brakes To Cool Them Down. Maybe Put Some Ducting Towards The Eaton. If You Have A Chiller Then You Run The A/c Anyway?
 

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How about this "cool" method?

Freeze solid 1 gallon ziploc bags of ice about 1" thick that are double wrapped in Ziploc (no cheap crap here) Freezer bags then crush just enough to form themselves over Heaton at the strip. If you think about it they couldn't melt that fast. Then if they went anywhere it would be backwards and the plenum would hold them in place. Now that might keep a little heat out.

I've froze them and laid them on there after a run and they will not melt that fast.
 

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How about this "cool" method?

Freeze solid 1 gallon ziploc bags of ice about 1" thick that are double wrapped in Ziploc (no cheap crap here) Freezer bags then crush just enough to form themselves over Heaton at the strip. If you think about it they couldn't melt that fast. Then if they went anywhere it would be backwards and the plenum would hold them in place. Now that might keep a little heat out.

I've froze them and laid them on there after a run and they will not melt that fast.
You could even spray a very cold substance like nitrous oxide through the intake and into the blower. This would definitely helps cool things down.:hmm::yahoo:
 

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^You my friend are a smart man.:imao:
 

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The Canadian Snowbra
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
What a new and innovative idea! lol Unfortunately, I doubt my old short block would appreciate that, lol
 

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If you were fairly handy you could make a "backpack" for the eaton out of a synthetic soft plastic or copper that would drape over it like a heat sink on electronics to absorb the heat and then run fluid through it to a heat exchanger or a killer chiller type mod to cool it down from the ouside.
This is the same concept you would use for computer electronics, you're just drawing the heat into something through direct contact /w heat attracting gel and then taking it away with liquid to be cooled in another location. You could even cool it on site by making a set of high speed high-volume air moving fans that would blow on your heat extracting device.
The whole idea is to take the heat away from the eaton and then cool that. Not the eaton itself.
 

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On Some Of My Road Race Cars, We Took Ducting And Put The A/c Vents All The Way To The Brakes To Cool Them Down. Maybe Put Some Ducting Towards The Eaton. If You Have A Chiller Then You Run The A/c Anyway?
You're saying you cooled the brakes with the a/c system on 'some of your road race' cars?
 

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If you have the killer chiller than why is the rotor case temperature an issue? Even after hard running arent your AIT's still lower than stock under the same conditions?
 
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