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Discussion Starter #1
i recently pulled my engine for the first time and noticed that the rubber bushings in the stock lower are pretty much shot. it's still functional, but no longer tight at all in the rubber bushing area, and has a lot of slop when turning. i can see heavy rubber dust at all three bushing areas.

this car has been my daily driver since i bought it new and has 130k. main reason i pulled the engine was to replace a timing chain tensioner due to a rattle on start up, but also wanted to sort of clean up the whole engine and replace gaskets, etc. it is a 2.80 pullied stock eaton with the stock caged lower.

so i'm thinking i only have a couple of options and wanted to get you guys' thoughts:

- obsolete part can no longer get from ford

- i can see that they may be rebuilt with success, but i don't think i have the capability to do this myself at home

- purchase one used off of ebay, but i think that might be hit or miss and i'd be right back where i started

- purchase a new stock sized (but non-caged) lower pulley assembly from metco


thanks very much for any thoughts or feedback :beer:
 

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Chris,

Assuming I was going to keep the lower support I would replace the rubber bushings with either Delrin, which is relatively easy to obtain and machine or another material called UHMWP which stands for Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethelyene. This is the bearing material used in joint replacements like hips, knees, shoulders etc. It is extremely dense, slippery beyond any dry substance you have come I contact with and absorbs shock loads extremely well — it is also pricey. The very good cost effective fix is the delrin replacements. You can buy a bar of it cheap cut the OD to size, bore the center and slice off donuts of the right size to work in the support. It will probably last forever.

If you have studded the crank, I would not worry about the absence or presence of the front support. If you haven't then I would definitely still run the support. It is worthwhile remembering the snout failures are caused by instantly dropping blower rotor pack rpms from 18,000 to 12,000 or so on a gear change with an aggressive clutch. The torsional tug on the snout is in the opposite direction it was micro seconds earlier. That back and forth twisting on the snout and the tug of the snout bolt are what will kill the crank.


Ed
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Chris,

Assuming I was going to keep the lower support I would replace the rubber bushings with either Delrin, which is relatively easy to obtain and machine or another material called UHMWP which stands for Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethelyene. This is the bearing material used in joint replacements like hips, knees, shoulders etc. It is extremely dense, slippery beyond any dry substance you have come I contact with and absorbs shock loads extremely well - it is also pricey. The very good cost effective fix is the delrin replacements. You can buy a bar of it cheap cut the OD to size, bore the center and slice off donuts of the right size to work in the support. It will probably last forever.

If you have studded the crank, I would not worry about the absence or presence of the front support. If you haven't then I would definitely still run the support. It is worthwhile remembering the snout failures are caused by instantly dropping blower rotor pack rpms from 18,000 to 12,000 or so on a gear change with an aggressive clutch. The torsional tug on the snout is in the opposite direction it was micro seconds earlier. That back and forth twisting on the snout and the tug of the snout bolt are what will kill the crank.

Ed
thanks ed - yes i would very much like to keep the stock setup as it has served me well for all these years.

perhaps i will get brave and try to disassemble the reverse-thread tribar assembly at home myself, and then install the bushings you recommend. some of the threads i have read about it though sound like the threads are easily damaged upon disassembly, and may need to be refreshed with a tap
 

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Try using some penetrating oil to free up any resistance due to rusting, Chris. I was looking at a Youtube video a couple months ago where they evaluated various penetrating oils from cheap to über expensive. Included in the test was also brake fluid as a penetrating oil. If I remember correctly it did as well as the high dollar penetrating oils, so a little brake fluid in the right places may make the job a bit easier also.

The other thing that will make the job easier is using a flywheel lock to lock the crank in place to make removal easier. While the tool makes life easier the pricing brings tears to your eyes. The ones I usually see are between $125 and $150 — yeah, I know ...


Ed
 

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Discussion Starter #5
for sure ed - prices on factory rotunda tools are insane! i have that flywheel locking tool and it comes in handy for sure

i was going to chime in on joe goffin's engine build thread about the factory lifting eyes he used... at the time he wrote it i think they were going for about $450 new for both... now, they're over $650... each!!!
 

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for sure ed - prices on factory rotunda tools are insane! i have that flywheel locking tool and it comes in handy for sure

i was going to chime in on joe goffin's engine build thread about the factory lifting eyes he used... at the time he wrote it i think they were going for about $450 new for both... now, they're over $650... each!!!
Whoa! $450 is insane pricing. $650 each is surreal! I got two of those with a crate engine I bought a dozen years or so ago. They have been very handy gizmos whenever an engine needed to be installed. On the crate motor they were free for nothing. Current pricing blows me away.

The flywheel locking tool is the way to go to loosen all that lower support stuff. The Rotunda tool you got back in the day is no longer available. There is a new generation tool they sell for the same purpose. I liked the original tool much better.

Ed
 
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