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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any of you guys have any issues with these? Just got a call from the shop putting my car back together and it finally cranked!!!! But, he said the factory oil gauge is reading at 0 (all though he knows there's pressure b/c it idled up, the back down and idled fine). Im sure it's no big deal, but just wondering if anyone else had any issues with theirs.
 

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The Canadian Snowbra
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115,000mi and mine works great
 

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He knows there is pressure simply because the engine ran? That doesn't mean there is sufficient pressure. The factory gauge is really just a switch that reads "NORMAL" if above 6psig. Anything below that and it reads zero. Sure, the sending unit can go out and cause exactly what you're experiencing. However, there is no way I would accept anything other than the mechanic connecting a known working external pressure gauge to confirm the engine is seeing the pressure it should. If that checks out, pay to replace the factory sending unit and you'll be on your merry way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
He knows there is pressure simply because the engine ran? That doesn't mean there is sufficient pressure. The factory gauge is really just a switch that reads "NORMAL" if above 6psig. Anything below that and it reads zero. Sure, the sending unit can go out and cause exactly what you're experiencing. However, there is no way I would accept anything other than the mechanic connecting a known working external pressure gauge to confirm the engine is seeing the pressure it should. If that checks out, pay to replace the factory sending unit and you'll be on your merry way.
He's checking on it with an external and will fix if necessary. Thanks for the input.
 

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I love the Ford Modular engines, esspecially the DOHC ones, But...The oil pump and it's design was the worst part of this package. Out of all the attention to detail they payed to these engines, the oil pump arrangemnt wasn't there best effort. Most engines run the oil pump at half the engine speed, were if the cranck is turning 5K RPM the oil pump is only turning half that or 2500RPM. On the 4.6 and 5.4 engines, the oil pump is running at engine speed, it has to because it is attached to the crankshaft. This causes a lot of un-needed wear and terbulance, in and on the oil system. Then to top that off, they chose to run powdered metal oil pump gear sets...???.... How this got past JG, I don't know, it must have been a huge cost savings? The fact that Ford just celibrated the 10th million modular engine built at the Romeo factory, tells me this is a very popular and durable engine, at normal levels. I just think the Terminator should have been an exception to the rule, and been built with better pump gears. Mainly, because they knew this engine would be tested many more times by the owners then the other 9.85 million engines they built.
While, most simply aviod the problems by installing a melling pump, I find the best way to deal with the problem is to aviod the problem all to gether, and remove the factory oil pump and depend on a external dry sump oil pump for the oiling duties. This system elliminates the highly airated oil the factory pump produces, and also elliminates the possibily of a oil pump gear problem. The dry sump pump draws less energy from the crank and producess many times more volume. You can easily adjust the oil pressure, and with this system the pump will never draw air, while cornering or under hard acceleration. Becuse you have so much more volume, the use of high quality racing filters, extra oil coolers do not pose a threat that they would with a stock system. Also, for those that like to run turbos, that extra oil volume will assure you have all the oil your turbo needs, while the engine has it's full share of oil as well. I area, all DOHC engine suffer with, is oil damming in the valve covers, and wip on the crank. The valve covers are litterly pumped completely full of oil, and that with the only real return route of flowing down from the front of the valve train covers, robbs the engine of power. By switching to the dry sump style, the bottom of the engine stays dry during use, the extra suction from the dry sump pump helps create a vacuum and allows that oil caught up in the valve covers to drain back to the bottom, without resorting to running down the front od the engine cover. Which, is mainly caused by the air and oil wipping around inside the lower end, which creates a pressure and that keeps the oil from properluy draining back to the sump. Another big advantage to using a dry sump system is the fact that you gain so much room under the engine. By using a dry sump oil pan, one esspecially made for dry sump system, you can save some 5-8", which is like gold when working around or on these engines. On purpose built cars, this would allow me to set the engine lower in the chassis, which would allow for better center of gravity, and would also allow you to pull the front of the nose down for better aerodynamics on the race track. I have not heard of or none my own studies (not yet anyway), but I would ecpect that with a dry sump system, and all the advantages listed, plus a few I didn't list, you could expect from engine performance and aero effect, somewhere between 100 and 150 extra HP, by going with a dry sump system. Maybe more on the high HP & dollar cars? The aero help would be much more on any cars running over 135 MPH, here those guys could see well over an extra 100hp in the form of reduced aero drag!
 
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