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I will be watching this thread...........I finally will givw up on the old "small - block" Fords. I still have a 68' 302 and an 87' 5.0 with trans to get rid of. Looking to learn more about the "mod" motors.
 

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will said:
new to mod motors, just got 98 cobra last month. can anyone just explain how 4.6 works compared to 5.0
Fastronald said:
I will be watching this thread...........I finally will givw up on the old "small - block" Fords. I still have a 68' 302 and an 87' 5.0 with trans to get rid of. Looking to learn more about the "mod" motors.
Even though completely explaining the operation of and differences between the 5.0 & the newer Modular 2V & 4V is a little out of my league, I'll give it a shot. This is by no means a complete history, and I'm doing this from memory, so please excuse any (minor) errors or omissions:

The 1st modular engine was used in the '91 Lincoln Town car, but the engine didn't find it's way into a Mustang until '96. The '96 - '98 2V (two valves per cylinder/one camshaft per head - aka "SOHC") was rated similarly power-wise to the 5.0 it replaced (225 hp even with less displacement), but suffered from poor flowing cylinder heads with round or oval intake ports. All 2V blocks are cast iron & weigh ~ 155 lbs. The iron block is deeply skirted and can handle quite a bit of power - the limiting factor for big power is the cast Hyperutectic pistons & "Cracked-cap" connecting rods (both of which will fail long before the block in a power-adder situation). '96+ Mustang 2V blocks have cross-bolted main caps, which add strength to the bottom-end - earlier 2V blocks from Cougars/Town Car/Crown Victoria/Thunderbird/Grand Marquis - do not have the cross-bolts. All 2V Mustang engines (with the exception of the Bullitt), come from the factory with a plastic intake manifold, and although it's very light, it can be replaced with a Bullitt or Ford Racing aluminum intake for more power.
With the exception of the 2000 Cobra R model, all '96 - '03 Mustang Modular V-8's have a 281 ci displacement, with tight cylinder bore spacing which was needed for installation in FWD cars. The 2000 Cobra R used a 5.4 Modular motor, but was released in limited numbers - only 300 were made - and proof of Cobra R ownership is required to buy any replacement parts. '96 - '98 2V engines use plug wires & coil packs, while the '99+ 2V's are coil-on-plug.

Ford addressed the power issues with the '99+ 2V - with improved cylinder heads with square intake ports. These heads are known as "PI" or "Power Improved" heads. Flywheel horsepower was raised to 260 hp. Although there are minor differences between the '96 - '98 & '99 + 2V's, the '99+ 2V is a big improvement & can replace the earlier motor if needed or desired.

The same type of tricks that work on a 5.0 can be applied to a 2V Modular engine - adding free-flowing shorty or long-tube headers, opening-up the intake flow by removing the air snorkle/silencer & adding a quality air filter, installing under-drive pullies, etc. One difference between the 5.0 & the newer Modular motors is that the Modular motor likes more rear gear than a 5.0 (assuming they are both close-to-stock or have similar minor modifications) - Modular 2v's seem to perform well with 3.73's as a bare minimum, and 4.10's are even better. Either gear would be fine for even a daily driver, due to the O/D transmissions used in '96 + Mustangs.
Another thing that Modular engines like is power-adders - Nitrous/Superchargers/Turbos - all go a LONG way on these engines. Modular motors especially LOVE Nitrous.

For more information on the 2V engine - including interchange data - MM&FF ran a great article back in their February '03 issue.

I'll add to this later and give a short overview of the 4V engine.
Gotta go to work now... ;)

PS: I'm going to change the name of this thread to "general Modular Motor info" so that more interested parties can benefit from it.
 
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