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So I swapped in a new 4.6

I had a bullitt motor and it took a crap. So I bought a standard 4.6 Mustang motor and dropped it in...

I turn the key to accessory and it reads all dashes for the mileage. There is also a weird, loud, constant buzzing coming from the box located in the front passenger fender when the key is turned on, and the PATS / theft light flashes quickly.

It will bump, but it won't turn over.

Any ideas...
 

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The box in the right hand fender well is the CCRM. This is a relay that controls power to the PCM, fan, fuel pump, and AC compressor.

The Cluster with all "-" means that the Cluster does not "see" the PCM. Likely because the PCM is not powered up. This is likely because the CCRM is not supplying power to the PCM.

If the PATS module does not "see" the PCM, it will not release the anti-theft. Hence the reason for the flashing theft light.
 

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The CCRM is full of relays.

It is available new from Ford, re-man from your local autoparts store, or from a salvage yead (only as last resort).

What model year car are we dealing with? Here is an example of a re-man CCRM.

http://www.oreillyauto.com/site/c/d...stang&vi=1362743&keyword=control+module+relay

Note. Recommend confirming that the battery is in good shape and that all of the connectors have been re-connected. The CCRM is an expensive part to replace for trouble shooting reasons.

Since you have just installed a new motor, double check your work. Focus on the small single connectors near the battery and intake tube.

Also DOUBLE check the battery terminals and grounds around the battery. Check the grounds around the radiator core support. Esp ground G103 located front engine compartment right hand side.

It sure would be a shame to buy a new CCRM only to find out that a missed connector was the cause all along.

The OP also stated that it would bump but not turn over. That also sounds like a low voltage problem. For low voltage to the starter, the first place to look should be the battery cables and grounds. If the voltage is low, this could also cause there not be enough voltage to "latch" the CCRM.

Suggest measuring the voltage at the main alternator B+ terminal. Post. Repeat while attempting to crank/start. If the voltage drops below 9-10 volts while cranking, very likely this is your problem.

OBTW, access the CCRM by removing the wheel and the plastic fender liner.
 

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Was wondering what the resolution for this problem was. Any updates?
 

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Exact same thing just happened to me. There is a connector right next to the battery tray towards the firewall side that is disconnected. Its the ground for the CCRM.
 

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Its a single wire connector I believe its a round connector. Mine was disconnected and ended up in the inner fenderwell somehow. Did you find a connector unplugged? If you cant find it I will go take some pictures.
 

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There are 4 misc connectors near the battery and battery junction box. One round connector with two larger wires. One side has a BK/WH and BK/YL wire on one side. There are two all black wires on the other side. This is connector C192. This provides the ground for the CCRM and the PCM. If not connected, this would exactly match the symptom.

The single wire connector is C146 is for the starter solenoid. The wire colors are WH/PK and BN/PK. Obviously if not connected, this would keep the starter solenoid from engaging. Another one of your symptoms.

How about posting pictures of the area around your battery? See if you can get the connectors just under the battery junction box.

Results from any of the other tests requested? This really could help narrow down where to look.

*edit* Disconnecting C192 is not needed to remove the motor. So unless you removed it, it seems unlike to be the problem's source. Where as removing the battery is needed to swap the motor. IMO, the symptom is related to a bad/weak ground some where in the return path. Of course the issue is finding the "where".

During a motor swap, the battery has to be removed. In terms of what is most likely, the negative battery terminals on many Ford products are bad about splitting when over tightened. I personally have experienced this on most of the Ford products I have. If this were my car, I would rule out a weak connection at the battery before looking at more difficult items.

Performing an actual resistance measurement from the Black wire on the CCRM pin#18 back to the battery negative would also rule in or out a bad CCRM ground (anywhere) as the problem. Once known, this would allow effort to be better spent.
 

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Was wondering what the resolution for this problem was. Any updates?
I can't say this will definitely resolve his problem, but I have learned a great deal about what causes the all dashes odometer issue on Ford instrument clusters.

When the odometer reads all dashes, it's either malfunctioning, or something else on the Controller Area Network (CAN) bus is malfunctioning. I was driving home one night and my speedometer and tachometer both dropped to 0 and my odometer went to all dashes, but the car was still running and fully drivable. I brought it home and parked it, and then it wouldn't start again.

I ran the instrument cluster diagnostics by holding down the trip odometer reset while turning the key from position 0 to RUN and waiting 10 seconds. If you do that, it comes up with the word "tESt" to let you know that you are in the diagnostic mode. Each time you hit the trip reset button, it cycles the diagnostics through gauge tests and displaying error codes and so forth. It reported a "dtcd262" error code or "Missing SCP message" which tells us that the instrument cluster isn't communicating with the other components on the CAN bus.

I searched the web and found there are some nice diagrams of the 2003 Mustang CAN bus which is likely identical to the 2002 so I used it as a reference. In that diagram, it shows that there are 5 processors connected to the various CAN bus lines within the Mustang, 6 if you count the instrument cluster. There is the General Electronics Module (GEM) which is responsible for rolling windows up and down, controlling the windshield wipes and washer, and other things like that. There is the Restraint Control Module (RCM) to handle the airbags, and the Antilock Brake System (ABS) module, and then there is the Powertrain Control Module (PCM).

I was fortunate enough to have a guy I could hire to come to my house with a professional Autel scan tool, even though neither of us really understood fully how to use it. Putting that thing on the OBD2 port, I was able to talk to every one of the processors except the Instrument Cluster, so we knew it was bad. That was surprising too because it seemed to work in every other way but it wouldn't talk to the Autel tool so it probably had a line driver or communication component failure. Also, the PCM wouldn't provide the VIN number to the tool, so I replaced it as well. Actually, I had assumed the PCM was the problem from the beginning so I bought the replacement before I found the guy with the tool. I think my old computer was mostly functional and probably would have worked, but the instrument cluster was definitely bad. Replacing both set me back $200 for the programmed computer and $35 for the junk yard instrument cluster.

You can probably diagnose most of these issues without the fancy scan tool so long as you have a poor man's ELM 327 or better. Using just about any scan tool, if you can't read the PCM and check codes, then you know something on the CAN bus is messing with it. So you can go in and disconnect the other processors until you can communicate with the PCM. The theory here is that anything connected to that bus can ruin communication for everyone else, and in my case, when I was using the ELM 327 to talk to the PCM, the instrument cluster was messing with the CAN bus and preventing me from talking to the PCM. That's probably what caused me to believe the PCM was bad. According to the diagram I found (i'll provide a link below), the instrument cluster, PCM, and ABS module are the ONLY components directly connected to the same serial lines so if your OBD2 port can't talk to the PCM, it has to be one of these guys causing the problem. You can disconnect both the ABS module and the instrument cluster, and if you still can't talk to the PCM, then you know you either have a serious wiring issue, or you have a bad PCM. You can use an ohmmeter to buzz out the cable connectors if you suspect wiring, but all my wiring looked fine so I pretty much knew it was the instrument cluster after I had already changed the PCM.

If you do change out the PCM and the instrument cluster, you are going to need to reprogram the Passive Anti-Theft System (PATS) so you will need a fancy scan tool to do that. They sell lots of these on Amazon and it looks like you can get a decent one for as little as $300, so if you don't have a guy with a fancy one, you might still be able to do this for a much cheaper price than a dealer would charge. If you can get your hands on a tool that will do a parameter reset, you can do the parameter reset on the PATS system, and then your new instrument cluster will be happy working with your PCM. I got my replacement cluster from a junk yard for $35, and the only issue I have so far is that it had 194,000 miles on it whereas mine had 138,000 miles. I figure somebody out there will be able to teach me how to reset the odometer to the correct mileage so I am not to worried about that. If I had time to dork around with the Autel, I am sure it could do it too. The only important note regarding the parameter reset is that you have to have 2 keys ready to program because the PATS system won't let you do it without 2. That and a 10 minute delay timer is all that stands between a thief reprogramming your car to work with his own keys!

This link will lead you to the diagrams I used to diagnose my car:
 
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