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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have my entire IRS out now and I was trying to think of a way to get air to the diff.
So I was thinking if I could open the side scoops (behind both doors), put a hole then run ducting behind the interior panel, under the back seat. Then put another hole in the rear tunnel to exit at the pumpkin. Obviously I would make sure it is sealed for water.
I was thinking this could get a good amount of clean air on the diff and help cooling without spending $1300 on the oil cooler.
Any input is appreciated, or if you know of other relative ideas.
James
 

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the only thing i wonder is how much air flow you would need to make a significant impact on the diff temp. How big are the holes you plan on making?
 

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The reason that heat exchangers/ radiators exchange heat so well is because of the design. Very thin pieces of metal and large surface area to dissipate heat, the pumpkin is jost not designed that way. The liquid coolant may need to be run to have a significant effect. Although, I could just be retarted..
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
no. I was thinking all the same things you are, thats why I asked for input.
That is the problem. There is no good way to transfer the heat other than directly (no cooling fins). But the major problem with the original design is that there is almost no air moving over the pumkin because it is fixed in a raised position and the exhaust runs directly under it. On a solid axle there not only is alot more mass there, it is more open the free air flow.
Just more input on how I came up with this,
James
 

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Good idea, but it won't work. There is very little pressure at that point on the car believe it or not. Kenny Brown used the scoops for a source of air, but they ran electric blowers to get any real air volume. I believe they cooled the rear brakes with that setup. You can do a diff cooling setup for way less than $1200. It's just some fittings, hose, an oil cooler w/fan, a pump and some brackets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I would bet your right about the lack of air pressure on the side of the car. That is pretty common on most cars. Usually you have to create negative pressure on the back side, and there wont be any negative pressure at the axle.
Anyone made their own oil cooler for the diff.? What pump, what size lines, where is the best place to put the lines? I can drill and tap holes easy now, I have it apart getting gears put in.
Thanks,
James
 

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1965 SPF 427 Cobra, & 2022 BMW M850
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You cool the rear end with a pump and heat exchanger (radiator) just like the road racing cars do. The pump is driven off the pinion and the heat exchanger is placed in the air stream of the moving vehicle. Most dry sump manufacturers have all the hardware already sorted out. All you have to do is buy it and install it.

Ed
 

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Tilton diff pump get the one with the upgraded vition seal #25 in the part number.
Derale aluminum heat sink 24 in long, fits under the rear bumper support.
Earls one way oil check valve.
A few 90 degree and straight -8 an fittings and 10ft of hose.
30amp derale fan relay with temp proble 3/8th 28 ntp for on/off.
Some wires and heat shrink.
Drill bit and 3/8th 28 NTP tap.
4-5 quarts of new gear oil.
Done.
Cost $300-$400.
 
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