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2003 Azure blue Mach 1. Built and Boosted
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've read over the original simplified cooling system thread and have moved my T-stat to the top hose using the Meziere in line adaptor with 180 T-stat, although I forget what I drilled for holes since its been a few months. I installed a GT lower hose to adapt to the Moroso block adaptor (it's what I had) after removing the OEM block adaptor. I have a remote oil filter installed as well. Although my car is not a Cobra (Mach 1) it does have the 4V motor and is Turbo charged using the ON3 4v kit.

I also had to remove the OEM fan due to space constrictions with the turbo. I went with a 2 speed Derale unit. It is wired in as factory and is controlled by the ECU.

My issue is that the car overheat every time I use the AC. What am I missing? It seems that everyone that in the original thread has had great success with the simplified system. I must be doing something wrong or maybe there is just too much under hood temperature. I do have all of my hot side wrapped though.

Should I just go to the Cobra engineering or ON3 crossover delete? Do I understand that this type of system is the best of the best as far as simplifying the OEM cooling system while also dealing with the head cooling issues and the bypass circuit that was deleted with the original.

Any help would be greatly appreciated

Shawn
 

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stock cobra/mach1 radiator?
 

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Like Chris (P49Y-CY) suggested take a look at your radiator. If it is the original you might be close to the best job it can do. A good aluminum aftermarket will substantially improve the cooling capabilities.

Additionally, the water inlet on the block is more important than most folks think. Many of the aftermarket adapters used to replace the OEM piece shortchange the adapter on the water inlet ID. The easiest way to throttle a pump is to choke off the inlet. If you think about it that is the exact way we control engine power — we choke off the intake. We just don't use the choke word. Instead, we call it throttling — but it is the same.

The two best adapters to replace the OEM piece were the FRPP adapter which had a 2" entry and the Cobra Engineering Piece which has a 1.75" opening. No one else even comes close. The FRPP piece is out of production these days. I am not certain what size inlet the Moroso adapter provides but I would bet it is smaller than 1.75". The Cobra Engineering adapter is money well spent.

Make sure your three T-Stat holes are no bigger than 3/16". A good starting point is 1/8" and go up in drill size increments. The holes do not need to be larger than 3/16". The first thing to check and likely replace is that Moroso block adapter.
 

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2003 Azure blue Mach 1. Built and Boosted
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the reply Ed. I had tried to change the radiator out for a Mishimoto unit but it wouldn’t fit properly. Since my car still has AC, the condenser the lines were in the way. If you compare the stock rad to the Mishimoto you’ll see that the OEM unit has provision for the condenser lines. The tank is made to accommodate the lines whereas the Mishimoto unit does not.

any recommendations of a radiator that will fit with AC still intact?

As far as the block adaptor goes I am not against changing it out for the Cobra Engineering one or the FRPP unit but I had to fabricate a pipe off the Moroso block to turn the inlet out towards the front of the car so the GT lower hose would work. Will the block adaptors you mentioned not need that provision? Do they have a 90 to turn the inlet pipe out to the front of the car instead of towards the wheel as the Moroso unit did. In the spirit of saving some money can I just port the Moroso unit to be a bigger inlet or is it just designed differently from the you mentioned.


Are the T-stat holes mainly for warm up or do they also control some of the cooling of the car?

And finally will I not need an actual bypass line from the lower rad hose to the t stat housing. I read that some people did and some didn’t

Shawn
 

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Shawn,

Use a preformed coolant hose. Here is a link to Pegasus Auto Racing and some of their preformed coolant hosing; click here => Pegasus Auto Racing. They also have a wide range of nice hardware for performance applications.

With respect to the radiator, check out the Be Cool units at Summit. Here is a link to the Be Cool website; click here => Be Cool. If I remember correctly, they can make a custom piece if they do not have a production radiator to fit your application. They are available direct from Be Cool and also through Summit
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Shawn,

Use a preformed coolant hose. Here is a link to Pegasus Auto Racing and some of their preformed coolant hosing; click here => Pegasus Auto Racing. They also have a wide range of nice hardware for performance applications.

With respect to the radiator, check out the Be Cool units at Summit. Here is a link to the Be Cool website; click here => Be Cool. If I remember correctly, they can make a custom piece if they do not have a production radiator to fit your application. They are available direct from Be Cool and also through Summit
Ok thanks Ed….much appreciated
 

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Take your time in the selection process. "Off-the-shelf" radiators can be pretty good solutions most of the time. However, if you find yourself in the uncomfortable position of not having any "off the shelf" solutions that seem to do the things you want, don't compromise; buy a custom-made unit. In the long run, you will be dollars ahead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks Ed,

I’ve also toy’d with the idea of modifying a radiator to work for me. It would actually only take some small fabrication to modify the passenger side tank to allow for room for the AC lines. I thought of doing that when I tried installing a Mishimoto that was supposed to ‘fit’ no problem. I just didn’t like the idea of cutting up a $500 radiator to do that.

I’ll look into the custom manufacturing route but I just have a hard time to believe no one else’s has run in to this issue.

I see where some manufacturers assemble their radiators with Epoxy VS soldering. What is your opinion on that? Soldering sounds better but is Epoxy capable as well?

One last thing. I don’t have the air deflector that is mounted on the bottom of the rad support. I believe it is there to create a low pressure behind the radiator which would help draw air through the radiator. Are those necessary?

thanks for your input as always. I’m going to check out a friends Turbo cobra to see what
he has for a cooling system. It’ll help me to put eyes on what someone else has done as well as your insights too.

Shawn
 

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The three ways to assemble radiator pieces are dependent on the material the pieces are made from. Older non-aluminum radiators are virtually always soldered. Aluminum radiators are welded. When made from plastic, the end caps for the coolant reservoirs, irrespective of the material the radiator is made from, will always require an epoxy or specially formulated adhesive for final assembly.

In the end, a custom-made aluminum radiator will address the important cooling issues/attributes you specify for your application and do it the way you intuitively expected it to happen. You might also be able to find a 'transplant' radiator from a different application that could potentially satisfy your needs, but then again, you might not. The custom-made route usually looks more expensive until you have a couple of false starts under your belt before going the custom route.
 
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