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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As I further progress into the planning of my future 1000+hp Teksid 4.6 engine build, I feel that a dry sump oil system is worth considering and Daily Engineering with its integrated multi stage oil pump and billet pan that eliminates a lot of the external plumbing looks to be the best solution for the 4.6 platform.




So with that said, I'm looking for examples of where on a 2001 Mustang to mount a five gallon oil tank and hose routing from the tank to the engine. I suspect that the trunk would be the only logical place to mount a large oil tank and since I plan to keep the full interior on the car, mounting the tank inside the passenger compartment is a non starter.
 

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What would be slick is if you could use a custom tank to fit the spare tire well. Similar to the trunk mounted intercooler tanks except modified or custom made for the dry sump oil reservoir.

Ken
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
What would be slick is if you could use a custom tank to fit the spare tire well. Similar to the trunk mounted intercooler tanks except modified or custom made for the dry sump oil reservoir.

Ken
Interesting idea to mount a custom tank in the spare tire wall. I think that the easiest thing to do is just mount a convention dry sump oil tank inside the trunk just like in this example:
 

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As I further progress into the planning of my future 1000+hp Teksid 4.6 engine build, I feel that a dry sump oil system is worth considering and Daily Engineering with its integrated multi stage oil pump and billet pan that eliminates a lot of the external plumbing looks to be the best solution for the 4.6 platform.




So with that said, I'm looking for examples of where on a 2001 Mustang to mount a five gallon oil tank and hose routing from the tank to the engine. I suspect that the trunk would be the only logical place to mount a large oil tank and since I plan to keep the full interior on the car, mounting the tank inside the passenger compartment is a non starter.
5 gallons of oil with tank and accessories is a fair bit of weight. I would put it where it will do the most good- in back, as low as possible. If that tank has baffles, I think you are on the right track.
 

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The Dailey system is great. The 4.6 is one of the 1st integral pans that Bill designed. Although a bit pricey, if you have the budget, you can’t do any better. Are you sure about 5 gallons (20 quarts!)? If you went with a 10 quart Peterson tank you might be able to find room in the engine compartment. Be aware that any oil level in the tank above the scavenge pumps will slowly drain back into the engine without a shut-off or check valves in the plumbing. When you shutdown, all the oil will want to drain back into the crankcase. The time frame depends on many things. Since the Dailey pan has very little capacity there is a possibly of flooding the crank. It’s no big deal in a race car because you just manually shutoff the supply line. However, in a street application that could be become a PITA. Also, forgetting to open the oil supply valve can ruin your day!
 

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I would roll this money burning a hole in your pocket into a standalone computer system. There is no need for a dry sump oil system on a street car. You would get much more value out of a proper computer to deal with 4 digit plus power. I have been making above 4 digit power for over a decade and never had an oiling issue of any kind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I would roll this money burning a hole in your pocket into a standalone computer system. There is no need for a dry sump oil system on a street car. You would get much more value out of a proper computer to deal with 4 digit plus power. I have been making above 4 digit power for over a decade and never had an oiling issue of any kind.
Even though you may be able to get by without a dry sump oil system on the street, controlling windage and eliminating pumping losses by putting the crankcase under a vacuum results in a considerable power gain as piston ring seal is improved and the motor no longer has to fight against a pressurized crankcase or oil hammering on the crankshaft. Plus, a dry sump system will look after your engine by eliminating bearing wear so for those reasons, I am considering the use of a dry sump system.

I will agree that an aftermarket engine management system is a good idea on a 1000 plus HP build for many reasons including getting past the factory RPM limits ( no matter what you do, the factory PCM does not have the ability to support revs past 7000RPM) and enabling flat shifting for those of us that have manual gear box.
 
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