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Herb, the advancing / retarding labels always refer to a reference starting point. Sometimes that point, in the case of pushrod engines, is the centerline the cam was ground on. In the case of 4V engines because we can set the cams literally anywhere we want it is easier if we just refer to the intake and exhaust centerlines we wish to use.

As you begin the process of cam phasing you will usually estimate a position close to what you are looking for based on how the cam manufacturer originally spec'd the cam. From that point you can 'advance' or 'retard' the cam as you see fit. The advancing rule of thumb you always want to remember is that, advancing the cam moves it further in the direction of rotation at the same crank position. Retarding the cam will move it further in a direction opposite the rotation of the crank.

Joe had -15.5˚ of overlap or said another way, he had 15.5˚ of crank rotation at TDC where both valves were closed. He did this to get a little better exhaust scavenging with the short exhaust event on the 96/98 cams. If you are close to TDC on the intake opening and maintain somewhere between 0˚ and 10˚ of crank rotation where both intake and exhaust valves are closed you will be very happy with both the engine's smooth but potent power delivery and also good driving manners at low engine speeds.

Even the 96/98 cams tend to be skimpy in the duration department but as you can see from Joe's dyno results, can produce some very nice power numbers. Use the 0˚ to -10˚ overlap guideline with both valves closed and open your intake on the 0˚ to 5˚ ATDC window and you can't go wrong.

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter · #206 ·
Using the max intake advance (4A) and max exhaust retard (4R) on the Cloyes secondaries, and straight up on the primary I get -12.2 overlap

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Discussion Starter · #207 ·
Or with 4A intake and 3R on exhaust, +1.5 on primary:
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It is sort of a six of one half a dozen of the other, Herb. You will be very satisfied with either phasing.


Ed
 

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Yea I meant Ed. Got you two mixed up for a minute. The sinus congestion in my head needs to release!!
If you ever see us in real life Ken, it's easy to mix us up. We're sort of like the two characters played by Schwarzenegger and DeVito in the movie Twins. I tend to identify with DeVito's character Vincent while Joe is more like Arnold's character Julius. :grin:

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If you ever see us in real life Ken, it's easy to mix us up. We're sort of like the two characters played by Schwarzenegger and DeVito in the movie Twins. I tend to identify with DeVito's character Vincent while Joe is more like Arnold's character Julius. :grin:

Ed
I was thinking that Ed is the picture perfect stately King, and I'd just be off to the side as a court jester;)
 

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I don't think soooo ...
 

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Discussion Starter · #213 ·
Getting ready to button up the motor finally! Wondering what everyone is doing to dress up the Aluminum block?
 

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The most visible components once the engine is installed, Herb are cam covers, blower, intake ait tract and various front end accessory drive items. The accessory drive items will collect a lot of belt dust so polishing them means a lot of ongoing maintenance to retain the bling factor. The other top end parts are easier to maintain so polishing, Hydrographics and old fashioned painting are common beauty treatments.

If you are considering polishing the blower I would discourage you from it. The as cast surface is supposedly better at dissipating heat. The polished surface not so much. In years gone by, we used to polish our GMC blowers and one time when I had to buy a replacement on the road th only one I could get was not polished. The unpolished blower actually lived longer and performed better. We quit polishing our blower cases ...


Ed
 

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The sky is the limit with dressing these motors up. I've seen crazy color combos on the cam covers and I've seen modest combos. They all looked good to me. Think about what your taste are and try to build from that. Metco idlers im the anodized machined finish looks great on any setup. Plus the double bearing option gives extra support where you need it. Do a search on google for "4v engine bays" and you'll get a good idea.
 

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My wife's car, always a work in progress. She wanted a polished Whipple and I was able to get a good deal on one a few years. Her cam covers are Sonic Blue to match the car and has a carbon fiber overlay hydrodipped onto them. Hope this helps you get a idea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #218 · (Edited)
I was really talking about the block and the heads. I am going with a black theme for most of what is under the hood, wrinkle black on the valve covers, front cover. The eaton right now is the gray finish.
The block has the milky look. wondering the best method to get rid of it? will try to post a picture, might be one above that shows it. ***you can see it in post 169***
 

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That coloration is caused by an oxidation of the aluminum casting's surface, Herb. It is more common to blocks from cold country where they use salt on the roads to melt the snow and ice. There are three ways to hide/get rid if it that I know.

If you are just looking to hide it the quick and dirty fix is to paint the exterior surfaces of block and heads. If the engine has not been assembled then you could try a soda bead blasting. The finished appearance is excellent but the cleanup to get rid of all the soda bead material that gets left on/in the block (and potentially oil passages) is a PITA. The last approach is the use of an industrial strength cleaner to wash the exterior of the aluminum casting. There are some commercial grade cleaners that will dissolve the aluminum oxide leaving a clean aluminum surface.

If you use one of the industrial strength cleaners be sure to use rubber gloves and a large protective rubber apron to keep it off your skin and clothing, thoroughly wash the exterior of the block to remove any residual cleaner and dispose of the wash waste responsibly.


Ed
 

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Discussion Starter · #220 ·
I am going to try using Alumi Brite. Will report how it goes.
 
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