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I have recently had problems with my transmission overheating. It has not thrown codes or anything like that, however after "spirited" driving, shifting gets more and more difficult. At first the transmission slides right into gear. As time goes on, however, shifting becomes difficult, and I can feel a huge ammount of heat radiating out of the transmission area. I know that some T-56's are air cooled, I know absolutely nothing of this subject so please help! How do I keep my tranny cool?
 

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The Ubiquitous Jimmy V.
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Your problem might be the Clutch heating up..Try adjusting the clutch..I put Mobil Syntheyic ATF in my tranny..It helped smooth shifts also..
 

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The Ubiquitous Jimmy V.
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GreyCobra_03 said:
Got the Redline ATF, works pretty well until I start having problems with heat. If it was the clutch, why would it be hard to get in gear?
I find at the track,,as clutch heats up it is harder to shift..So i Adjust clutch and shifts get easy again..
 

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I agree with Jim.....I had serious problems with the clutch heating up my first time to the track at FFW in Richmond. It finally kept me from racing in the final rounds on Sunday. It got to the point where I had no reverse and had to use both hands to get into any gear to make it to the pit. I let it sit for a few hours and watched the rest of the day. When it cooled it was fine. A good reason why I am installing a clutch quadrant and firewall adjuster to get a bit more adjustment than the stock setup.
 

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I also agree with Jim. The clutch not totally releasing is the most likely problem. It worked for me to add the UPR quadrant and firewall adjuster, with the factory cable (have to modify upper end, but it works). With the adjuster, you must be careful not to set it up where the throwout bearing is always riding on the pressure plate release fingers, otherwise you will get premature throwout bearing wear/failure. I also cut a hole in the sheetmetal clutch fork cover and added a universal clutch return spring to make sure the fork moves back and gets the throwout bearing away from the pressure plate release fingers.
The clutch grab & release point will still be fairly low when adjusted properly, but it will stay the same until the cable slowly stretches.
On newer factory clutch setups, the clutch disc is made with spring steel ears that the two halves of the clutch friction discs are attached to. This is unlike aftermarket "racing" discs that have hard non-spring plates/ears in between. The spring steel
ears help to soften clutch engagement. After 5-10K miles, the spring steel ears will begin to flatten in between the fiction discs and will allow the clutch to release quicker - until then, the pressure plate must move further to get a full release, since the clutch disc will be effectively thicker as the springy ears push apart the friction discs when the pressure plate is trying to release. So, on newer cars the poor factory "self-adjusting" quadrant AND this friction disc "expansion" are both likely causes of incomplete clutch release.

Ratt
 
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