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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
Few more updates for those that don't visit svtperformance.
Way back in December I won a $500 gift card to lethal which I used to get a set of ARH headers and mid pipe. They sat around for quite a while waiting for it to warm up so I could cerakote them.
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While I had the k member out I pulled the oil pan to fix a leak and pulled the timing cover to upgrade my tensioner arms and modify my primary tensioners.
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Discussion Starter · #62 ·
Unfortunately I ran into a road block . I hadn't bothered fitting up the mid pipe because I didn't think there would be any issues there. When to throw it on to button up the car and found the collector aims straight into the trans cross member.
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After mulling over my options I decided to forgo the factory style crossmember all together and change it to a 99+ style trans mount so I went and grabbed some brackets from the junkyard . Then I got the Stiffler's mount in mocked up and welded it to the trans tunnel. That way I didn't have to worry about anything exhaust related now or in the future.
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All mounted up with a new Stifflers trans mount/crossmember
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Exhaust buttoned up
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The first time I drove on a hot day I ran into an issue with fuel boiling/pump cavitation on really hot days that I hope I addressed by running the return line further away from the pickup in the tank. I also completely wrapped all the fuel lines from the mufflers back in heat shield sleeve. I had previously wrapped a smaller sections close to the exhaust.
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While the car was on jack stand i tried solving my pulley alignment issues once and for all. I had a laser alignment tool but I found even that wasn't fine enough to really do what I needed. So I started off by setting the car up on jack stands so that the crank was at 90° to the ground.
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The first thing I checked was if the blower was parallel to the crank vertically which checked out fine.
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Next i took a plumb bob and dropped down from the crank on both sides to a piece of tape I had on the ground to create a reference marks. You can see it hanging in the crank angle picture, it just isn't tight yet. Once I had that reference line I removed the balancer, water pump, idlers and tensioner to give room to drop the plum bob off all of the other pulleys. I stuck a magnetic light on the oil pan pointing down and used the shadow it created to line up a straight edge with the reference marks from the balancer.
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Discussion Starter · #63 ·
It's hard to see in the picture but the supercharger marks are just a hair off of the crank line. This was dropped down from the sc pulley to the straight edge. It was tough to measure but it came in about .065" out of alignment from the balancer. The AC and power steering were perfectly inline with the balancer and the Alternator was just a hair further out. All I did for the alternator was retorque the lower mounts and make a new set of hold down brackets for the top that should hopefully do a better job of keeping it from flexing.
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I had 1 washer behind each of the mounting bracket spacers that were about .045" thick so I went ahead and removed those and redropped the line.
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This was the result. Hard to get a good picture but it is pretty much dead nuts over the edge of the straight edge. I was pretty happy with this so I went ahead and buttoned up the front end of the car again.
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I was able to take the car out for a decent test drive last weekend and the modifications to the pulley alignment seemed to work. Belt didn't move after several wot runs as well as some decent engine decel which is where I could most frequently replicate the issue.

Unfortunately the trip wasn't without it's issues. The ambient temperature was about 88°F and although it took a little longer the fuel temp eventually got up to 115°F when the car started having erratic fuel pressure and started running rough. This was with all of the lines near the exhaust wrapped in heat sleeve and the return line ran to the opposite side of the tank as the pickup. I am thinking that the first instance of cavitation was enough to hurt the pump permanently which is now driving up my temperatures. So I am currently debating sending back to Fuelab for inspection.

On a positive note one of the pulls I did while testing appeared to show my knock sensors working correctly. The car currently has 93 in it with the waste gate set ~10lbs. I did a pull from 3k to 7k saw a peak of 11 lbs and in the middle it detected a knock event, pulled 2 degrees of timing two ignition events in a row for a total of 4 degrees. It then ramped right back up to the desired timing curve and finished the pull without issues. I had no idea during the pull any of it happened.
 

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Very impressive job, Tommy! Any build is hard enough; doing good documentation is even more challenging. Your work in the build and on the doc fits into the Oh WOW! category. I am not sure how you find the time, especially with a newborn baby.

I am curious why you chose to use an external fuel pump instead of an intank pump(s).

Really nice work!
 

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If the fuel regulator is located in the engine bay you may want to look into moving it outside of it somewhere upstream so the return fuel is sent back to the tank before entering the hot engine bay. Here's a great thread on it:


ks
 

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Discussion Starter · #66 ·
Very impressive job, Tommy! Any build is hard enough; doing good documentation is even more challenging. Your work in the build and on the doc fits into the Oh WOW! category. I am not sure how you find the time, especially with a newborn baby.

I am curious why you chose to use an external fuel pump instead of an intank pump(s).

Really nice work!
Thanks Ed, having our first kid certainly slowed down the project. I think i've only driven the car ~5 times this year and it took almost 6 months to do the long tubes. It certainly isn't my priority.

My reasoning on the single external pump vs multiple internals was simplicity. I know multiple in tank pumps is the favorite of the majority of users here but when I initially laid out the project in my head I preferred the single pump for the single point of failure. The fuelab pump's internal pwm driver was the biggest reason I decided to go with the one pump. It simplified the wiring and control. If I had to run an external controller I probably would have ended up with multiple pumps. That decision may be causing me some headaches now but I think I can get this sorted out.

If the fuel regulator is located in the engine bay you may want to look into moving it outside of it somewhere upstream so the return fuel is sent back to the tank before entering the hot engine bay. Here's a great thread on it:


ks
I read through that thread as well as a few others before constructing my fuel system. Keeping the fuel cool was one of my concerns with the big external pump. I have the regulator in the passenger fender well running the fuel rails deadhead. I believe the only other places it could be picking up that much heat would be the exhaust pipes from the axle back or the pump having cavitation damage. I have all the fuel lines wrapped with heat sleeve in that area and am running the pump pwm to limit flow back to the tank so my suspicions have been focused on a faulty pump.
 

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I read through that thread as well as a few others before constructing my fuel system. Keeping the fuel cool was one of my concerns with the big external pump. I have the regulator in the passenger fender well running the fuel rails deadhead. I believe the only other places it could be picking up that much heat would be the exhaust pipes from the axle back or the pump having cavitation damage. I have all the fuel lines wrapped with heat sleeve in that area and am running the pump pwm to limit flow back to the tank so my suspicions have been focused on a faulty pump.
Excellent. For reference I use aluminum 1/2" fuel lines and these run within maybe 2 inches or less from my muffler and I have no heating issues. Aluminum dissipates heat extremely well compared to rubber or teflon especially since fuel continuously flows through it in our systems.

Since fuel is continuously flowing through the lines I can't imagine it picking up that much heat since it should also be getting cooled by the air flowing around the lines...but.....?

ks
 

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I meant to comment on your primary chain tensioner modification, Tommy. That is a very smart way to go! The modification is an original Sean Hyland technique and is not widely known. I think we wrote it up once for either Joe Goffin's build or my own — I can't remember which anymore. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #70 ·
What is the tensioner mod, Ed? I went back and reread his post #61 with the tensioner pic but can't determine what is the actual mod. I can't find my Sean Hyland book at the moment.
If you looking at the ratcheting arm in the tensioner picture you'll see that 3 of the last teeth are ground off of it. This prevents the tensioner from over tensioning when on a two step and experiencing extra slack in the chain. If left unmodified it can over extend and end up breaking the tip of the tensioner arm off if a two step is used frequently or the car is often on the limiter. The other side of the mod is the spacer that is below the main tensioner plunger. This is installed to prevent the tensioner from losing tension in situations where there is low or no oil pressure.

I am hoping that the tensioner mods, new billet tensioner arms and upgraded teskid dowel will allow me to use my two step for the forseable future without any issues.
 

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Tommy, while you can (if you wish to) run the ratcheting arm, it is unnecessary when you run the spacer. If you choose to run it, it is best to remove at least three or four teeth from the bottom as you have. The spacer, if made to a 0.200" length, will prevent the chain from going slack as engine speeds cycle up and down.
 

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Thank you both for replying.

I have often wondered (or even worried) about that tensioner. I can understand it in a street environment when things like oil pressure or temps are fairly constant. But racing can be chaotic. Things like the two step, extreme rpm, high oil temps, high oil pressures, different viscosity, etc., can cause a wide range in forces and be problematic. Has anybody gone with a simpler spring loaded design? Spring force is more or less constant and it seems that such a design would be considerably simpler and more tolerant of the variables. The OEM design has both spring force and variable hydraulic force (due to varying oil pressure). However, when you change any of the variables in racing, problems arise. Why not design away from the hydraulics?
 

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The challenge with a spring force solution is that it is variable in the pressure it applies based on the spring rate and the amount of compression the spring is subject to. As engine speed increases, the plunger extends, and the spring force reduces by the change in spring length multiplied by the spring rate. The effect is the opposite of what you need in a running engine. As the chain stretches, you want the piston to push against the tensioner with minimally the same force as before the chain began to stretch. If the applied force is greater and the chain is already under increased strain (which is causing the stretching), you risk breaking one of the pins that hold the adjacent links together, essentially destroying the chain and expensive components in the engine.

Even with a constant force such as an oil system design provides, the additional strain that stretches the chain plus the force exerted by the tensioner brings the chain closer to its design limits, read failure. A particularly aggravating scenario for the chains is the use of a 2-step that establishes the engine launch rpm by turning the ignition on and off, producing a wind-up and unwind event with the chains. The wind-up phenomenon is reasonably apparent. The unwind phenomenon is more obscure. At first, we intuitively want to think the 2-step just 'un-tensions' the chain. In fact, it tensions the chain in both directions during 2-step operation. The net effect is to hammer the little pins back and forth that hold the links in the chain together, until one breaks. Look at your crank sprocket at the next freshening event for your engine. You will see how the 2-Step has beat up the drive sprocket on the snout of the crank, the same thing, albeit to a lesser extent, for the gears on the cams.

Repeated 2-step launches and high spring rate valve springs (which we need for performance) have a destructive effect on all the timing chains and gears on the front of the engine, including the chain from the exhaust cam to the intake cam. Depending on the frequency of 2-Step usage and intensity of the on again, off again behavior of the 2-step (read your launch rpm), you will eventually cause one or more of the drive chains to fail. If the car is a race car, you might want to consider chain replacement each winter as you freshen the engine. If the car is a race car, and it races every week, you might want to consider a mid-year chain maintenance regimen replacing the chains preemptively to avoid a costly rebuild before year-end.

If you have a drive-by-wire throttle and an aftermarket EFI system, you might be able to tell the EFI system to hold a particular rpm in a steady state condition, even with your foot on the floor. Then using a switch on the clutch pedal linkage, tell the ECU to go to WOT when the clutch releases and the pedal closes the switch. This approach to setting a launch rpm would be much better and much easier on the camshaft drive chains and sprockets than a traditional 2-step.
 
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