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Awesome Thread Joe, thanks for taking the time to post and document... getting ready to Dive into one of my own very soon... I have a Teksid and a Kellog to start... lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #242 ·
Awesome Thread Joe, thanks for taking the time to post and document... getting ready to Dive into one of my own very soon... I have a Teksid and a Kellog to start... lol
Glad you are digging it, Steve. Any questions, shoot me a note. Hope all goes well with your build!
 

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Discussion Starter · #243 · (Edited)
A little light progress today before I get ready to drop the transmission and pull the original engine...

I had snagged a spare set of cam covers for dirt cheap and decided to have them coated to match the timing cover (silver). Just picked them up, plugged in all the new grommets (from the FelPro kit) and re-installed the bushings for the breather line and PCV fitting. Also mocked up my FGT COP covers just to see how they'd look against the silver. Not bad:

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Here's a back view with the seals pressed in (also part of the FelPro kit). I also had removed the baffle plates before sending them out to be coated, so they went back in as well. The screws have a 5.5mm head, but fortunately I have an E-8 Torx bit (for the front ABS sensors) that fit them perfectly, so that was a quick job.

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Unfortunately, I'm still waiting on the bolts for these, but hopefully they'll roll in next week. For now, I mocked them up on the engine just to keep them off my garage floor. The passenger side exhaust manifold is also bolted on. This was a new set I scored from a crate engine a couple of years ago and had JetHot coated. After about 1,000 miles, they still look good as new.

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The driver's side exhaust manifold is just hung loosely for now, but after the cam covers go on, I can snug up the dipstick then tighten these up. I'll also have the oil cooler transferred over shortly. My apologies for the glare - my garage door has windows in it, and the sun peeked out from behind the clouds as I snapped this one. Lots of "aluminum" for sure!

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Quick view of the front with the pulley bridge hung loosely for now. I didn't bother getting it coated since it was perfectly clean. Again, my apologies for the glare (bad cell phone pics!).

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Not too much longer and it will be time for the transplant!
 

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Discussion Starter · #245 ·
Engine looks great Joe. I'm a fan of the silver look. Glad to see it coming along. Do u plan to re torque the heads after the break in?
Thanks, Ken - I dig the silver look as well!

I know that Ed mentioned the notion of re-torquing the studs, and what a nightmare it will be. I haven't thought about it much so far, but I'd sure love to think it can be avoided and let it casually slip to the back of my mind. Now that you brought it back up, I'm probably on the hook for sure;)
 

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Thanks, Ken - I dig the silver look as well!

I know that Ed mentioned the notion of re-torquing the studs, and what a nightmare it will be. I haven't thought about it much so far, but I'd sure love to think it can be avoided and let it casually slip to the back of my mind. Now that you brought it back up, I'm probably on the hook for sure;)
Trust me, its a couple of hours plus well spent and no (I told you so's) from a certain old elderly gentleman ......AHemmm, ahemmm.........
 

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Discussion Starter · #249 · (Edited)
Ahemmm, ahemmm ...
I know, I know...................no sense in doing it if it's not going to be done right!

Trust me, its a couple of hours plus well spent and no (I told you so's) from a certain old elderly gentleman ......AHemmm, ahemmm.........
Just a little bit of denial on my part, but I know I'd never hear the end of it from that certain gentleman!!

Uh oh. I opened up a can of.....lol
Just a little bit:bigwink:

Still dreading it though - that won't change!

------------------------------------------

A bit more fun this evening: I took the supercharger off as a complete assembly and unhooked just about everything from the block (just a couple odd's and end's left). I'll get around to dropping the transmission next week when I'm back in town and then out this beast comes! MY OTC "lifting eyes" are mounted up as well, so that will make it real easy to get the load leveler attached.

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I give a +1 on the heads re-torque. The first 3 time I rebuilt my engine I did not re-torque the heads, and I had problem with the head gaskets. The last time (2 years ago) I did the re-torque, and no problem since then...
 

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Discussion Starter · #251 ·
I give a +1 on the heads re-torque. The first 3 time I rebuilt my engine I did not re-torque the heads, and I had problem with the head gaskets. The last time (2 years ago) I did the re-torque, and no problem since then...
Yeah, I figure it is going to happen. Just have been trying to keep the thought out of my head since removing the cam covers while the engine is in the car is such a pain in the a$$!! At least if the engine is fired for the first time within the next several weeks, it's not like I'll be driving until spring, so I will have the time to do it. Besides, Ed would never let me hear the end of it if I had any issues later!
 

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I agree. I just replaced the cam covers on my wifes 03 with some custom ones. It truly is a time consuming job. Nothing like a pushrod engine for sure. Since we are one the subject (and I brought it up, lol) what is the recommended time period/cycle before the retorque.
 

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I did approximately 500 miles and a racing night. Ed always said to let it idle up to temp and do the re-torque.
Yes it's a time consuming, took me one day per side, but in the end, it was much less time consuming than pulling the engine out again.
 

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I can't imagine who this old geezer that is being mentioned might be ... :)

For the best (safest) results you want to start your new engine let it idle and have the engine come up to normal operating temperatures. When it does, shut it off and put it away for the night. Next day (or later after it's cooled down) but ideally before you fire it again pull the covers and retorque in torquing sequence order all the head studs loosening them one at a time and taking them back to final torque before going to the next stud. I know this is a real PITA.

If you choose to drive the car before retorqing it is best not to let the engine get into boost. Just do Sunday go to meeting sort of driving until you retorque the heads. The gasket manufacturers don't like to tell you to do this because you'll buy gaskets from the manufacturer that does not tell you to abuse yourself.

The problem is less of an issue on engines with iron blocks and iron heads because iron has a relatively low co-efficient of thermal expansion. Put on a set of aluminum heads and now you have a fair amount of growth attributable to the temperature increase in the head and aluminum' s higher co-efficient of thermal expansion. Go to an aluminum block and aluminum heads and something very special happens.

With an aluminum block and aluminum heads you have the greatest expansion possible, that is attributable to heating aluminum. The head studs however are not aluminum — they are ARP steel and their co-efficient of expansion is relatively low comparatively speaking. When the block and heads grow but the studs don't all the expansion has to be absorbed by the head gaskets through additional compression of the gasket. This additional gasket compression creates a new stack height for the gasket that is less than when you assembled the engine.

If you don't retorque the heads, the now thinner stack height of your head gaskets reduces the clamp loading of the head studs and when you put the engine under load you push out a head gasket — a real PITA!! The retorquing of the gaskets after the first heat cycle properly re-loads the head gasket after that first heat cycle providing the type of and quality of gasket seal you originally tried to create.

A lot of work but if you have aluminum heads or worse heads and block, it is to your advantage. BTW if you have never tried CopperCoat or GaskaCinch they are excellent products, a little messy, but they help with head gasket sealing.
 

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Glad you are digging it, Steve. Any questions, shoot me a note. Hope all goes well with your build!
thanks bud... I know sbf like the back of my hand but these are new to me so to speak... I'll have lots of questions along the way and it will be a long process. (money and time, lol). I might need a hand decreeing cams.... I'm undecided on what route to go at the moment, along with many other things. more reading and research are needed on my end. I'm not one to just run what everyone else is or says...
 

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Does anybody have the proper torque spec for the M9 main bearing cap side bolts.. I'm using the ARP 156-5002 bolts. The factory spec is 30 ft. lbs. plus 90 degrees for TTY bolts.

When I go by ARP's chart for torque by bolt size it looks like it should be about 45 ft. lbs.... Maybe as high as 50 ft. lbs.
 

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45 is the number

Daniel
 

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Definitely looking forward to seeing how they turn out, Ed. I still think pestering James may be worth it, but if your way turns out to be exceptionally simple, then maybe it is something anyone else can tackle on their own. Be sure to post up some pics when you are all done!
OK guys here they are and some pics of how they were made, some additional photos similar to Joe's about how the disassembled tensioners look and where they go as you reassemble.

I started with a 1 ft length of 3/4" 095 wall, seamless 4130 tubing because that was the closest that McMaster had to the size i needed. This is the tubing from McMaster. Aircraft Spruce will be less expensive than McMaster for the same tube;

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I started to clean up the end with Scotch-brite™ and then decided it would be easier in the lathe so this is how it looked after a few seconds and Scotch-brite™;

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The next job was to face off the end to make it square and chamfer the edges prior to parting off a piece. This is the parting off operation;

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After the parting off I broke the sharp edge next to the cut off and the job was complete. Repeat this one more time and you have two pieces. Total time was about 30 minutes plus clean up.

The spacers fit below the existing plunger as Joe has already indicated. After installation, they will prevent the chain tensioner from compressing and allowing the chain to go totally slack when the engine is shut down. This is a pic of how they fit into the OEM tensioner assembly;

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When you use the spacers the ratcheting plungers are no longer required and can be removed.

There are a number of components in each assembly and as luck would have it they are different from side to side. As a result, I highly recommend you do one tensioner at a time, and when you are done place it in a poly bag with all its internals. Here is an exploded pic of most of the internals;

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The right tensioner piston has a lubricating hole drilled in its top center. This piston will have a black plastic metering disc that goes into the inside top of the piston. The left tensioner piston will have no lubricating hole and no metering disc.

The ratcheting arm that we normally cut teeth off of is no longer required and can be discarded when you use the spacers beneath the tensioner piston. The metering valve you see in the pic below goes into the bottom of each piston well and is used to meter the volume of oil from the main galley that is fed to each piston to maintain chain guide pressure against the slack side of the primary drive chain.

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If you happen to remove it in the modification process be sure to reinstall it prior to your final assembly of the tensioner. The metering disc goes in with the pictured side facing the movable tensioning piston.

That's about it. This is not a particularly complex mod but it is a very good mod to do. The chain stretch at high engine speed or from a two-step will cause the ratchet to extend on an unmodified tensioner and maintain tension on the primary drive chain as if it were stretched the way it was at high engine speeds - even after you shut off the engine.

That primary drive chain tension will squeeze the oil out of the #1 cam bearing saddle after the engine is shut off. The next time you start your engine you will have metal-to-metal contact until oil pressure can be restored to that journal. Repeated performances like this will eventually scar both the cam journal and the bearing saddle in the head. The next act in this unhappy show is the seizure of the #1 cam journal in the head. This is accompanied with the breakage of the primary drive chain and all the collateral damage the engine is capable of heaping upon your wallet.

Do the mod. It is easy and the smart thing to do.
 

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As far as the head stud retorque...unless there is a trick I am unaware of, how do you even get the passenger side valve cover off without removing the super charger?? I may live to regret it, but it will be a cold day in hell before I yank the SC to just retorque the head studs. I think with the factory Eaton, you can remove the plenum and get to the valve cover but with the KB 2.2, the plenum removes from the back. Am I to understand you remove the plenum from the rear of a KB in order to gain access to the valve cover and ultimately the head studs...?
 

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I don't have a KB Jeff so I can't say with certainty but I do have a Whipple and I can say, with certainty, the plenum has to be removed to get the passenger side valve cover off. While I always recommend the re-torque, and I know its a PITA, in the end it is the car owner's call whether or not they want to go through the pushups.
 
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