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Russ,

I buy mine at Amazon, click here => Prolong - 1 Gal. they also have the 12 0z bottles, click here => Prolong - 12 oz. The bottles are usually around $17 and the gallon jug is about $68, so the jug cuts the cost per treatment about in half or a bit less.

You can usually find it at your local Auto Parts store also for somewhere around $20 for 12 oz.

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter #782
Great deals on it for sure, Ed. I had looked on eBay and found a gallon for $72, but Amazon works just as easily. My two 12-ounce bottles at AutoZone were only $20 each, but will definitely score a jug soon.

Funny enough, I just changed the oil on my Explorer and when I put the receipt in my envelope, totally spaced out that I also added a bottle of Prolong 5,000 miles ago. Talk about slipping my mind. Will definitely look forward to seeing how its UOA looks this time around since the wear metals have been higher since day one, I'm guessing due to the turbochargers.
 

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Interesting about the metals wear. I would expect to see diminished wear metrics going forward.

Give me a shout next time you find your way to CA and we can get together again for some food and talk time.


Ed
 

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Haven't made any updates to this thread in a while since there really hasn't been much (well, still have a desire to get the tuned tweaked after adding the Whipple), but the engine is still just purring away and running amazingly well. Definitely looking forward to some more drives, especially to get over to a dyno somewhere.

Anyway, for some fun, added another performance vehicle to my fleet yesterday (the Anniversary of Henry Ford's passing in 1947): a 2020 Explorer ST. The new 6th Gen platform is just amazing, and the 3.0L Ecoboost engine - a derivative of the F-150's 2.7L version - is just a beast. Really feels like a truck again, and with the new engine, it's like having a V-8 under the hood. Definitely a step up from my previous '14 Explorer Sport, which was just a big Taurus SHO. Even better, the ST vehicles come with a trip to the ST Experience courtesy of Ford Performance, so that should be loads of fun soon enough:)

First white vehicle ever, totally love it.

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Nice choice, Joe.

Daily drivers with suitable creature comforts and responsiveness to the cockpit commands of the Pilot are always satisfying to drive.


Ed
 

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Definitely dig it, Ed. Lots of fantastic tech and advances in the powertrain. Can't complain about the massage function in the seats either, especially since they are ridiculously comfortable. If only the A320's were this nice!
 

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Discussion Starter #787
Some fun stuff on this new Ecoboost engine, adding to the info on it coming from the F-150's 2.7L: it's a hybrid iron/aluminum block that uses a lower cradle of aluminum to strengthen the base iron block. Really enjoying it so far, especially with the FP tweaked suspension and the roughly 50/50 weight balance. Not really wanting to hassle with any aftermarket tunes at the moment, but hopefully FP will get a new ProCal out soon enough for this platform.

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Just a couple extra pictures I snapped after finishing with the clutch: crank damper and pulley cage.

With the flywheel holding tool in place, it was perfect to get these installed. I had picked up a spare damper from an engine with less miles than my original, which made it nice to leave my first one in place. Installation was easy, but since I neglected to do the stud mod on the crank, I needed to rent the OEM 27144 install tool from AutoZone. You do not want to pound the damper on, nor do you want to use the stock bolt to draw it down! One way could lead to thrust bearing damage, the other could destroy the threads in the crank.

In any case, here's the tool (a threaded shaft with adapter(s), along with a large nut and bearing to draw the damper down):

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Tightening sequence if you've stayed with the OE bolt, as an FYI:

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The "new" pulley installed along with the new inner belt. With the ARP bolt and washer, it went on at 125 ft/lbs (like the cams) with their lube on the thread and under the bolt head. Don't forget to add some RTV in the keyway to seal it as the pulley moves back. I used the same black RTV as I have on the other required areas of the engine.

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I did also pick up new belts and went with the Gatorback line, which is now made by Continental as their "Elite". I dig their tires, so I figured these belts will be a great addition as well. The inner belt is six-rib, 96". I goofed on the outer belt and should have grabbed one in 75" or maybe 74.5" (it is eight-rib), but I inadvertently got one that is 75.5". I'll check to see if it fits, but most likely it will have to be exchanged - not a big deal. They are definitely nice belts.

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Inner belt routing diagram for good reference:

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After that, I mounted the pulley bridge back on, then installed the cage. As a refresher, it takes a 14mm hex bit, and has a left-hand thread (counter-clockwise to tighten!). Also, do yourself a favor and put some anti-seize on the threads in case you have to remove it again. Despite how much of a pain it can be to break free (mine was easy, fortunately), it only goes on with 74 ft/lbs of torque. Once this was done, I pulled out the flywheel tool and re-installed the starter. Also shown are the idler pulleys that I believe are from VMP, which were acquired from Jon Pavia last year (they look like those made by Billet Pro Shop). The two on the right (upper and lower) are 100mm, and the center is a 90mm. I prefer the clean look of these over the other ones out there.

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Install diagram for reference:

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Pulley bridge diagram in case you forget where the bolts and studs go (the one upper bolt won't be used since I have the Idlers & tensioner):

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This was about where I left off, and at this point, just need to re-install the alternator, torque down the rest of the bolts & studs, attach the brackets that hold the wiring harness, then add the belt. Here is the secondary belt drive diagram:

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Once the transmission is up, the coolant hoses and tanks will go back on, then I'll finish up the small stuff on top of the engine. In no time at all, I'll be adding the oil, priming the pump, and getting ready to turn the key! More later in the week.
Hi Jeff, where did you find the torque spec for the ARP crank bolt as 125? I've seen a wide range of figures on my search for the correct spec-90/100/112/125.
 

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You just find each "COP control" wire on the harness, and add the taps. Here they are snapped on, including the one for power (note they are staggered to streamline the bundle as much as possible). Don't go too far down since the harness needs to make the bend in order for the plug to fit back in to the computer:

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I know these types of wiring taps are pretty commonplace and are the easiest way to split a wire, but I am somewhat on edge about wiring. My thought would be to use a 10 position Weatherpack clip with metri connectors to have a separate, easily detachable wiring harness. What I can't really nail down is what is an OEM style way to splitting a wire? I've seen the below style which seems to be heading in the right direction, but this still feels a little DIY.

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I am also considering the use of a trailer wiring box and would then look to stuff it in proximity to the footwell. Feel like it's a janky way to setup the internals though.

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Maybe there is another way with another electrical product I've never heard of?
 

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Use crimp ring ends at posts and crimp unions in line. Two wires in one end one wire in the other crimp both sides. Protect the connection with heat shrink tubing installed prior to crimping. Easy, peasy ...


Ed
 
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